Lent & Easter

Save the Date: Fri, MARCH 1st – BYZANTINE ART: From Constantinople to Florence to Heaven and Back

BYZANTINE ART: From Constantinople to Florence to Heaven and Back
Friday, March 1 • 6pm
Whitney Community Center, Jackson, NH
with John Heroopoulos, MDiv.

Hosted at the Whitney Community Center in Jackson, NH, this program features the expertise and passion of  Rev. John Heropoulos, MDiv

  • Offering exquisite images in an illustrated survey of Western art from 3,000BC to the Byzantine era
  • Exploring the difference between Byzantine and Renaissance art
  • Including iconography and religious subject
  • The event is co-sponsored by the Bartlett Union Congregational Church and the Jackson Community Church.
  • Program is free and open to the public.
  • Hosted at Whitney Community Center in Jackson, NH

LENT & EASTER: Save these Dates

  • Thurs, Feb 8: Mardi Gras with DelleValla Trio plus Louisaina Cuisine by chef Sue Carrigan at JCC
  • Wed, Feb 14: Ash Wednesday

    • Ashes-to-Go at J-Town Deli, Glen Ledge/McSheffreys North and JCC
    • Ash Wed Service hosted at Nativity Lutheran Church at 6;30pm
  • Wed, Feb 21: Vision Board Workshop with Clare Long (RSVP) at JCC
  • Thurs, Feb 22: Lenten Book Group on zoom at 7pm: Discussion of Wild Hope

  • Sun, Feb 25: Game Day at JCC
  • Fri, Mar 1: Byzantine Art presentation with John Heropoulos, MDiv at Whitney Community Center, co-sponsored by Bartlett Congregational & Jackson Community churches
  • Wed, Mar 6:
    • XC Ski meeting at JCC
    • Soup Supper at JCC
    • Vespers Service at JCC led by Nativity Lutheran worship team
  • Thurs, Mar 7: Felting Easter Eggs with Kathy Seymour (RSVP) at JCC
  • Thurs, Mar 14: Lenten Book Group on zoom at 7pm: Discussion of Wild Hope
  • Thurs, Fri, Mar 28: Maundy Thursday

    • Mandy Thursday Foot-washing Service hosted at Bartlett Community Church & co-officiated by Rev Gail Doktor and Rev John Heropoulos
    • Soup Supper hosted at Bartlett Community Church
  • Fri, Mar 29: Holy Friday

    • Vigil at JCC
    • Via Crucis at JCC
    • Service of Shadows – ecumenical celebration hosted at Nativity Lutheran and facilitated by Clergy of the Eastern Slope with message by John Heropoulos, MDiv
  • Sun, Mar 31: Easter

    • Sunrise Service at end of Presidential Dr, Jackson
    • Easter Service with Flowering of Cross plus special music at JCC followed by
    • Easter Egg Hunt – participation in community event

 

 

SAVE these DATES in February & March (including Lent)

  • Thursday during Lent (Feb 15, Feb 22, Feb 29, Mar 7, Mar 14, Mar 21): Lenten Book Group led by Walt Hampton via zoom
  • Sat, Feb 3: Men’s Breakfast with chef Chris Doktor at JCC
  • Sun, Feb 4: Game Day at JCC
  • Thurs, Feb 8: Mardi Gras with DelleValla Trio plus Louisaina Cuisine by chef Sue Carrigan at JCC
  • Wed, Feb 14: Ash Wednesday
    • Ashes-to-Go at J-Town Deli, Glen Ledge/McSheffrey’s North and JCC
    • Ash Wed Service facilitated by Clergy of the Eastern Slope (location to be announced)
  • Wed, Feb 21: Vision Board Workshop with Clare Long (RSVP) at JCC
  • Sun, Feb 25: Game Day at JCC
  • Fri, Mar 1: Byzantine Art presentation with John Heropoulos, MDiv at Whitney Community Center, co-sponsored by Bartlett Congregational & Jackson Community churches
  • Wed, Mar 6:
    • XC Ski meeting at JCC
    • Soup Supper at JCC
    • Vespers Service at JCC led by Nativity Lutheran worship team
  • Thurs, Mar 7: Felting Easter Eggs with Kathy Seymour (RSVP) at JCC
  • Thurs, Fri, Mar 28: Maundy Thursday
    • Mandy Thursday Foot-washing Service hosted at Bartlett Community Church & co-officiated by Rev Gail Doktor and Rev John Heropoulos
    • Soup Supper hosted at Bartlett Community Church
  • Fri, Mar 29: Holy Friday
    • Vigil at JCC
    • Via Crucis at JCC
    • Service of Shadows – ecumenical celebration hosted at Nativity Lutheran and facilitated by Clergy of the Eastern Slope
  • Sun, Mar 31: Easter
    • Sunrise Service at end of Presidential Dr, Jackson
    • Easter Service with Flowering of Cross plus special music at JCC followed by
    • Easter Egg Hunt – participation in community event

 

 

Emmaus Reflections

SONGS anout WALKING TOGETHER and EMMAUS:

POEMS recited:

Servant Girl at Emmaus
— Denise Levertov (inspired by the painting above by Diego Valázquez  c.1620)

She listens, listens, holding her breath.
Surely that voice
is his—the one
who had looked at her, once,
across the crowd, as no one ever had looked?
Had seen her?
Had spoken as if to her?
Surely those hands were his,
taking the platter of bread from hers just now?
Hands he’d laid on the dying and made them well?
Surely that face—?
The man they’d crucified for sedition and blasphemy.
The man whose body disappeared from its tomb.
The man it was rumored now some women had seen this morning,
alive?
Those who had brought this stranger home to their table
don’t recognize yet with whom they sit.
But she in the kitchen,
absently touching the wine jug she’s to take in,
a young Black servant intently listening,
swings round and sees
the light around him
and is sure.

What is Hope?
Rubem Alves – Brazilian Theologian
What is hope?
It is a presentiment that imagination is more real
and reality less real than it looks.
It is a hunch
that the overwhelming brutality of facts
that oppress and repress is not the last word.
It is a suspicion
that reality is more complex
than realism wants us to believe
and that the frontiers of the possible
are not determined by the limits of the actual
and that in a miraculous and unexpected way
life is preparing the creative events
which will open the way to freedom and resurrection….
The two, suffering and hope, live from each other.
Suffering without hope
produces resentment and despair,
hope without suffering
creates illusions, naiveté, and drunkenness….
Let us plant dates
even though those who plant them will never eat them.
We must live by the love of what we will never see.
This is the secret discipline.
It is a refusal to let the creative act
be dissolved in immediate sense experience
and a stubborn commitment to the future of our grandchildren.
Such disciplined love
is what has given prophets, revolutionaries and saints
the courage to die for the future they envisaged.
They make their own bodies
the seed of their highest hope.

Looking Back from Emmaus — Christine, Faith in Grey Places: https://faith.workthegreymatter.com/emmaus-poem-looking-back/

He told us 
everything happened for a reason.

And you know, ordinarily, 
I wouldn’t have believed him.
A stranger on the road
No one we know 
Not even aware 
of why we were grieving.

It seemed.

It’s such an easy thing
To dismiss the pain,
To claim there was a reason why,
Make it make sense,
Who are you comforting really?

But this time was different.

It wasn’t that he didn’t know
Or wouldn’t reckon with
What we’d witnessed.
He saw it all.
Much like he’d seen it all
As it was happening.

And that wasn’t the strangest part.

Because he didn’t tell us that
Some day we’ll look back
And it’ll all make sense.
Rather, we could look back now.
Like everything pointed to now.
The picture was complete
If we could but see it.

Our hearts were burning inside us.

And I wonder, 
If we’d met him a day sooner, 
What we’d have said.
Whether we’d have welcomed him
Or asked to share bread.

But I guess,
In this at least,
Everything happened for a reason.

Conversation — William Cowper

It happen’d on a solemn eventide,
Soon after He that was our surety died,
Two bosom friends, each pensively inclined,
The scene of all those sorrows left behind,
Sought their own village, busied as they went
In musings worthy of the great event:
They spake of him they loved, of him whose life,
Though blameless, had incurr’d perpetual strife,
Whose deeds had left, in spite of hostile arts,
A deep memorial graven on their hearts.
The recollection, like a vein of ore,
The farther traced enrich’d them still the more;

They thought him, and they justly thought him, one
Sent to do more than he appear’d to have done,
To exalt a people, and to place them high
Above all else, and wonder’d he should die.
Ere yet they brought their journey to an end,
A stranger join’d them, courteous as a friend,
And ask’d them with a kind engaging air
What their affliction was, and begg’d a share.
Inform’d, he gathered up the broken thread,
And truth and wisdom gracing all he said,
Explain’d, illustrated, and search’d so well
The tender theme on which they chose to dwell,
That reaching home, the night, they said is near,
We must not now be parted, sojourn here.
The new acquaintance soon became a guest,
And made so welcome at their simple feast,
He bless’d the bread, but vanish’d at the word,
And left them both exclaiming, ’Twas the Lord!
Did not our hearts feel all he deign’d to say,
Did they not burn within us by the way?

The Road to Emmaus — Sandra R. Duguid

There have been crucifixions, too,
in our town–innocents
gunned down in their doorways
or in school halls; or radiations
black outlines, three crosses
marked a sisters chest: no wonder
we walk in quiet rage, musing

And who, on this road, will join us,
seeming unaware
of the worst news in the neighborhood,
but spelling out the history of the prophets
and a future:
       Ought not Christ to have suffered these things
       and to enter into his glory?
Could our hearts still burn within us?

Will we ask the stranger to stay?
Break bread? And how
will our well-hammered and nailed
kitchens and bedrooms appear to us
when we understand who he is
just as he steals away?

Emmaus 1 — Malcolm GuiteLuke 24:17 ‘He asked them, “What are you discussing together as you walk along?” They stood still, their faces downcast’.

And do you ask what I am speaking of
Although you know the whole tale of my heart;
Its longing and its loss, its hopeless love?
You walk beside me now and take my part

As though a stranger, one who doesn’t know
The pit of disappointment, the despair
The jolts and shudders of my letting go,
My aching for the one who isn’t there.

And yet you know my darkness from within,
My cry of dereliction is your own,
You bore the isolation of my sin
Alone, that I need never be alone.

Now you reveal the meaning of my story
That I, who burn with shame, might blaze with glory.

Emmaus 2 — Malcolm Guite— Luke 24:25-26 Then he said unto them, O fools, and slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken: Ought not Christ to have suffered these things, and to enter into his glory?

We thought that everything was lost and gone,
Disaster on disaster overtook us
The night we left our Jesus all alone
And we were scattered, and our faith forsook us.

But oh that foul Friday proved far worse,
For we had hoped that he had been the one,
Till crucifixion proved he was a curse,
And on the cross our hopes were all undone.

Oh foolish foolish heart why do you grieve?
Here is good news and comfort to your soul:
Open your mind to scripture and believe
He bore the curse for you to make you whole

The living God was numbered with the dead
That He might bring you Life in broken bread.

Words of Remembering 
— Maren Tirabassi

We come from heart-felt “Hosannas,”
and a long season
of feeling like withered fig trees.

We come from an alabaster jar
abundance of love and hard questions.

We recognize experiences
of betrayal, denial,
and the feeling that everyone we love
has fallen asleep and left us alone,
so we recognize this holy story.

We remember Jesus washed feet
and offered a covenant
of himself broken and poured out
for a small group of followers long ago
and for us in our time,

and was risen on Easter
though, even in the joy of resurrection,
he kept blessing and teaching,
accepting hospitality
and giving us hope to eat.

THE ROAD TO EMMAUS
— J. Michael Sparough, S.J.

Our eyes falling down to the ground,
Our hearts dry as the dust we trample.
A stranger joins our journey to despair.
Teasing out the details of what our hope had been,
He listens on and on until our grief can say no more,
Only then can his words water our withered spirits.
Gently chiding, strongly guiding, weaving a story
Of glory hidden within fabled prophecies of faith.
Later will we recall how fiercely our hearts did burn.
But now it is our turn, the time to beg him to linger,
A request he can never refuse, for his very presence
Is sacred space, every home he visits his sanctuary.
For those who have eyes to see, his bread blessed,
Broken and shared – so much more than merely a meal.
His visitation no longer con@ined to history.
This road we walked with him still beckons —
To journey back from where we once despaired,
Our eyes now open in hopeful recognition.

The Road to Emmaus

Anna Louise Strong

How many tread, in the twilight,
With hearts that are crushed and still,
The road that leads to the valley,
Away from the templed hill.

They are leaving their beautiful city,
The place where their hopes turned fears;
And naught remains of their longings
Save bitter, hopeless tears.

The Comforter draws near them
As they their steps retrace,
But their eyes are dimmed with weeping,
They see not the Master’s face.

He walks in the twilight beside them,
Tenderly bidding: “Rejoice.”
But they see Him not for sorrow,
They know not the Master’s voice.

And he follows, patient, loving,
On to the journey’s end,
Till a light breaks in upon them,
And they see in the stranger their Friend.

And they know what seemed destruction
Was life in God’s great plan.
And they glimpse His wondrous workings
In the destiny of man.

Back to the beautiful city,
Back to the templed hill,
They turn with joy, proclaiming
“The Lord is with us still.”

Emmaus Blessing
— Jan Richardson

Already a blessing
in the walking

already a blessing
on the road

already a blessing
drawing near

already a blessing
in the listening

already a blessing
in the burning hearts

already a blessing
in the almost evening

already a blessing
in the staying

already a blessing
at the table

already a blessing
in the bread

already a blessing
in the breaking

already a blessing
finally known

already a blessing
give us eyes

already a blessing
let us see.

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