RACIAL JUSTICE EVENTS & DATES to NOTE:

Resources to educate & engage about racial justice

RESOURCES
Below are some resources focused on education and engagement around racial justice. Use what you find helpful. What is happening in this nation is complicated, and cannot be simplified into absolutes, binary/dualistic categories, or declarEveryday Racism: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atfVUgyEIOIations that make us only “either/or”, “good/bad”, “right/wrong”, “in/out”. Use these resources as starting points for deeper and more comprehensive engagement in our own community.

LIVING BLACK in NH & Mt Washington Valley:

STARTING POINTS to DISCUSS RACE & RACISM as a FAMILY:

READING: Collected lists & resources for different ages

  • Racial justice library @ JCC: Find many hard copy books / recommended titles on the bookshelf inside the Jackson Community Church’s front entrance. Sign out books and return when done.
  • Jackson Public Library’s website  http://jacksonlibrary.org/ and reading lists/borrowing recommendations. See title recommendations on the website.
    • Reading lists  through local library coop: Jackson, Cook, Madison and Conway libraries have shared lists for adults, teens and children within our joint KOHA catalog on books across our collections on race, racism and anti-racism. There is also a list pertaining specifically to children’s books at the Jackson Library on these vital topics.
    • You can email staff@jacksonlibrary.org or leave a voice message at 603-383-9731 if you have requests.
  • Dr. Nicole A. Cooke, the Augusta Baker Endowed Chair at the University of South Carolina, has created a list of Anti-Racism Resources for all ages
  • NY TimesThese Books Can Help You Explain Racism and Protest to Your Kids
  • USA TodayBooks to Learn More About Anti-Racism
  • Embrace Race: 31 Books for Children about Race, Racism, and Resistance

BOOKS to GET YOU STARTED

  • Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do by Jennifer L. Eberhardt
  • Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Jason Reynolds and Ibram X. Kendi (Young Adult version of the book Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi)
  • How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi
  • Me and White Supremacy by Layla Saad and Robin DiAngelo
  • So You Want To Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo
  • The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander (see prologue in 10th anniversary edition for excellent new critique of current trends)
  • Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson
  • Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • White Fragility by Robin DiAngelo and Michael Eric Dyson
  • Tears We Cannot Stop : Sermon to White American by Michael Eric Dyson (par)
  • When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir
  • Our Kind of People: Inside America’s Black Upper Class by Lawrence Otis Graham
  • Becoming by Michelle Obama
  • The Vanishing Half by Brit Bennett
  • Killing Us Softly (women in advertising – personalizing women and subliminal messages)
  • Why Are the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? And Other Conversations About Race by Beverly Daniel Tatum
  • Color of Water by James McBride (written from perspective of being bi-racial)
  • Racial Profiling: Everyday Inequalities by Alison Marie Behnke
  • When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir by  Patrisse Khan-Cullors, Asha Bandele
  • A Good Cry: What We Learn From Tears and Laughter by Nikki Giovanni (poetry)
  • The Complete Poetry by Maya Angelou (poetry)
  • Fiction:
    • Beloved by Toni Morrison (all works of fiction and nonfiction)
    • Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult
    • Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
    • On the Come-Up & The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (Young Adult novels)
    • Hailstones and Halibut Bones by Mary O’Neill (children’s story)
    • Corduroy (children’s book)
  • On indigenous people’s experiences and perspectives:
    • Blackfoot Physics by David Peat
    • Indigenous People’s History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
    • The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Alexi Sherman (fiction, Young Adult)
    • An American Sunrise: Poems by Joy Harjo (poet laureate)
    • God is Red: A Native View of Religion by Vine Deloria (and other works by same author)

RACISM

HISTORY of RACE, BLACK EXPERIENCE and RESISTANCE MOVEMENTS in America:   

SLAVERY:

WHITENESS & WHITE PRIVILEGE:

JUSTICE, INCARCERATION & POLICING:

ACTIVISM & BEING an ALLY:

COMMUNICATION, CONFLICT RESOLUTION & LANGUAGE:

EDUCATION, ECONOMICS, HEALTHCARE, HOUSING, REDLINING, VOTER SUPPRESSION and More:

INVESTING
in nonprofits & community needs identified by crowd-source funding:

CHURCHES and FAITH COMMUNITY RESOURCES:

PUBLIC POLICY BODIES
that are exploring and shaping equity initiatives and conversations in New Hampshire:

This Week at JCC and Around: TUE, Sept 15 – SUN, Sept 20

TUE, Sept 15

  • CLERGY LUNCH
    12:30pm • Zoom
    Local clergy gathering for meal and discussion.
  • Community Event: LIBRARY PICKUP/PRINTING HOURS
    2-6pm • Jackson Public Library
    You can place a hold –
    • online via your Koha account using your 14 digit library card number
    • Contact by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org. or leave a voice message at 603-383-9731
    • We will send you an email as soon as your item/s are ready for pickup. If you need to make special arrangements, please let us know, we want to help.
    • Printing and scanning services are also available. Contact us for details.
  • TRACES of the TRADE Film Screening & Discussion
    5:30pm Zoom Link required.
    • Registration is requested for online event; admission  free. View as a family! Great conversation-starter. Child-friendly.
    • Register for free via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/traces-of-the-trade-registration-120275524331.
    • More info on the documentary is available via. www.tracesofthetrade.org.
    • Excerpt from press release: Jackson Public Library and Jackson Community Church co-sponsor the timely online screening of Traces of the Trade: A Story From The Deep North, followed by a discussion facilitated by co-hosts Dain Perry and his wife Constance Perry. Facilitator Dain Perry is one of nine cousins featured in this documentary that unearths a hidden legacy of slavery in America. Traces of the Trade: A Story From The Deep North, first shown at the Sundance Film Festival, follows the journey by filmmaker Katrina Browne  and nine of her cousins — including Dain Perry — into the dark past of the slave trade, which enriched their white New England family.  Allow three hours to watch the film and share in the conversation.

WED, Sept 16

  • UCC Event: NH ANNUAL MEETING PLANNING TEAM PREP SESSION
    9am • Zoom
    Rev Gail participates as member of the planning and worship team.
  • Community Service: WAY STATION BOARD of DIRECTORS
    9am • Zoom
    Board meeting to discuss policies and programs. JCC volunteers attend as officers of board.
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church
  • Community Event: SATURN & STARS ASTRONOMY FIELD PROGRAM
    7:30pm • Tin Mountain Conservation Center
    Matt Maloney introduces us to the late summer night sky. Utilizing a telescope and laser pointer we’ll look at the amazing rings on Saturn, see Jupiter as well, and navigate our way through the celestial dome by learning the early fall constellations. All of this will take place at a beautiful open orchard location in Shelburne. Matt will also tell some of the stories behind the constellations names and show how observing the zodiac can serve as a way of marking the earth’s journey around the sun. It should be a fun evening. Space is limited. Reservations required; call 447-6991. The North Country Nature Series is sponsored in part by the Neil & Louise Tillotson Fund at the NH Charitable Foundation.

THURS, Sept 17

  • Community Event: BIRD WALK (Tin Mountain Conservation Center)
    8am • Meet at Valley Cross Rd, Jackson, NH
    Led by Tin Mountain Conservation Center staff.
  • Community Event: YIN/RESTORATIVE YOGA with Anjali Rose
    8am • Zoom (Link provided once participants complete health waiver is sent to anjalirose15@gmail.com and registration/payment for class received.) See Anjali’s website for full list of classes offered and instructions to register. 
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church
  • Community Event: LIBRARY PICKUP/PRINTING HOURS
    2-6pm • Jackson Public Library
    You can place a hold –
    • online via your Koha account using your 14 digit library card number
    • Contact by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org. or leave a voice message at 603-383-9731
    • We will send you an email as soon as your item/s are ready for pickup. If you need to make special arrangements, please let us know, we want to help.
    • Printing and scanning services are also available. Contact us for details.
  • Community Service: WAY STATION SHIFT
    3pm • Curbside package preparation
    5pm • Shift at curbside with guests
  • Community Event: CRAFTUP (Jackson Library)
    4pm • Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/888091236 
    All crafts and all skill levels are welcome.
  • Community Event: FLOCKS of FALL – Warbler Talk
    7pm • Zoom link to come.
    Lifelong birder Will Broussard will help us prepare for fall migration with tips for identifying common and not-so-common warblers headed south for winter. Aspects of autumn identification will be examined including plumage and foraging behavior.

FRI, Sept 18

  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church

SAT, Sept 19

  • Community Event: LIBRARY PICKUP HOURS
    10am-2pm • Jackson Public Library
    You can place a hold
    • online via your Koha account using your 14 digit library card number
    • Contact by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org. or leave a voice message at 603-383-9731
    • We will send you an email as soon as your item/s are ready for pickup. If you need to make special arrangements, please let us know, we want to help.
    • Printing and scanning services are also available. Contact us for details.
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church
  • Community Event: COLD RIVER RADIO SHOW MINI-CONCERT – Duke Robillard
    4:30-7pm • Wildcat Inn & Tavern garden
    Dinner Reservations Required: Not included in ticket price – Call  603-383-4245 for dinner reservations. Show Tickets are $40 and DO NOT Include Dinner. Online ticket sales only: $40/pp.  TICKETS: https://aspectproductionsnewengland.com/tickets.

SUN, Sept 20

  • INTERFAITH SERVICE
    8am •  Zoom & Pavilion behind Whitney Community Center
    Small group gathering outside at pavilion. Use social-distancing protocols: bring your own mask and chairs. Join us for poetry, worship, and prayer.
    • Zoom Link required.
    • Option: Call on touch-tone phone.
  • CHOIR REHEARSAL
    9am • Zoom
    • Zoom link required.
    • Option: Call on touch-tone phone.
  • IN-PERSON WORSHIP in SANCTUARY
    9:15am • Social-distancing & Masks REQUIRED
    We will use only designated open pews only (2 out of 3 pews are roped off). Families (and quaran-team groups who have already been in close proximity) may sit together. We avoid passing of peace, handshaking, hugs, etc. We also ask that you use hand sanitizer. Worship will be streamlined with scripture, prayer and live music by Alan Labrie (if he’s able to arrive while worship is in session): no congregational singing. When worship ends, we will immediately be preparing for the next zoom-based 10:30am worship service. If you have any signs of illness such as fever, cough, congestion, stomach upset, you are courteously asked to remain home and care for yourself.
  • VIRTUAL WORSHIP (Zoom) including interview with local author,  artist & activist JANIS PRYOR
    10:30am •  Zoom link required.
    Join us for worship, music, reflection, prayer, scripture. Stay for virtual coffee hour. Service will also be live-streamed to website and Facebook (if technology supports this function on the day of event). Afterward, recordings of worship service will be posted to FacebookVimeo.com channel & Youtube.com channel. Option: Call on touch-tone phone.
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church

FAREWELL to BEULAH JODRIE

SERVICES:
11am • Private family gathering in sanctuary
Noon • Funeral Service in sanctuary

(Service open to family and church and community friends who knew Beulah.)
Early afternoon • Funeral service at JCC will be followed by private graveside service for family in Chocorua, NH.
BIOGRAPHY: The family shares this biography.

Beulah Viola Jodrie was born on March 21, 1921 in Alton Bay, New Hampshire, at the southern tip of Lake Winnipesaukee. Her mother was Irish catholic living in Boston when she first met Beulah’s father, who was a true Yankee woodsman. He was working as a chauffeur, and kept his long hair hidden under his cap. They fell in love and eloped.

Beulah was one of 9 children and was extremely close to her siblings and parents but in particular her father, who became a White Mountain guide. They had many adventures together probably the most important for Beulah were the hikes in the White Mountains. Other than her girls, she came to love the mountains more than anything else. She felt free in the hills and taught her girls to enjoy the outdoors and mountains too. She would hike whenever she could, even as she aged, never able to give up the quest of just “one more time.” She often hiked alone, with just water and a couple of oranges! She didn’t need anything else, except to move forward on the trail… to reach the summit; whether Mt. Chocorua or Mt Washington.

Beulah was a scholar, although, in her timidity would never admit it. She was an avid and voracious reader from very early on and never gave up her love for books. She excelled academically, never receiving a grade lower than an A; and was the Valedictorian of her high school class. From there she went on to the Conservatory of Music in Boston, studying the violin for two years. After realizing she didn’t care to be in the spotlight on stage she left the Conservatory and moved to be closer to her then love, Bob Jodrie, when she enrolled in a nursing school in Gardiner, Mass. Shortly thereafter, realizing she and Bob did not want to be separated she moved to Fitchburg to be closer to him. They married shortly thereafter and began their family. Daughters Sharon and Gretchen were born in Fitchburg. A short time thereafter they moved to RI where a new adventure started for Beulah. She had two more daughters, Jennifer and Melissa. At the age of 40 she decided she wanted to continue her education and enrolled at Barrington College where she received her BA in literature; then enrolled at Brown University where she received her Masters. After getting her Masters, Brown offered her a teaching position, teaching American Literature – her favorite authors were William Faulkner, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Walt Whitman and Henry David Thoreau. These writers touched her soul and she wanted to give their message to her students – which she did with the utmost sensitivity and earnestness. They adored her for that.

Beulah moved back home to Madison, New Hampshire after retiring to care for her husband, Bob, until his passing in 1998. She lived independently until 2017 when she moved to Merriman House for support. She will be deeply missed by her family and all who knew her.

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