ANNUAL PLANT SALE SAT, MAY 30th • 9am-12pm

Corrected date (due to cold spring weather): ANNUAL PLANT SALE
Time: SAT, MAY 30th • 9am-12pm
/ Plant drop-offs 8-9 am
Location: Jackson Community Church parking lot
Raindate: Sun, May 31 • 1-4pm / Plant drop-off 12-1pm

  • Questions? Email Gloria: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org
  • Donate plants: if you are fortunate enough to have an abundance of plants; perennials that need dividing,  extra seedlings, or a healthy houseplant looking for a new home…please consider donating to our sale! If you need pots, please help yourself to the ones under the outside stair at the church.
  • Drop off plants: Leave them at the Jackson Community Church (under the outside stairs) anytime starting Monday, May 18. If you wish to drop them off the morning of the sale, we will have a driv-thru area where we help you unload from 8 – 8:45am on Sat, May 30.  Please identify all plants dropped off.
  • Buy plants: Come the day of the sale to choose from a large selection of locally grown perennials, annuals, seedlings, and houseplants to enhance your home and gardens!
  • Proceeds support food-insecurity programs: The fundraising from this plant sale will help those suffering from food insecurity, both locally and internationally. 
  • Social distancing guidelines will be in place. 
    • No change will be given; so bring cash or checks, round up as needed, and drop your contribution in the container. Plants will be separated onto tables divided by priced.
    • Remember your face mask & gloves!
  • Also accepting shelf-stable food donations to go directly to serve locals with food insecurities. A basket will be placed on-site to collect items such as peanut butter, canned meals: canned soups & chilis, canned pastas, canned chicken or tuna, energy bars/granola bars, hiking snacks (individually packed), peanutbutter or cheese crackers.
  • Note: This fundraising event has been reviewed and approved by the town’s selectpersons and its emergency-response team and may operate with appropriate safety guidelines. It is considered an ‘essential service’ under agricultural functions.

Music: “I Believe”

Our choir performed a beautiful song on Sunday called “I Believe”. Music is written by Mark Miller. The video was filmed by Chris Doktor on Horton Ledge/Pine Mountain. Choir directed by Billy Carleton and music played by Alan Labrie.

The lyrics of this song were adapted from a poem written by a Jewish prisoner on a cellar wall in a WWII concentration camp. The full poem is here, but feel free to share the video …

I BELIEVE
“I believe in the sun
even when it is not shining
And I believe in love,
even when there’s no one there.
And I believe in God,
even when he is silent.
I believe through any trial,
there is always a way
But sometimes in this suffering
and hopeless despair
My heart cries for shelter,
to know someone’s there
But a voice rises within me, saying hold on
my child, I’ll give you strength,
I’ll give you hope. Just stay a little while.
I believe in the sun
even when it is not shining
And I believe in love
even when there’s no one there
But I believe in God
even when he is silent
I believe through any trial
there is always a way.
May there someday be sunshine
May there someday be happiness
May there someday be love
May there someday be peace….”
– Author Unknown

What if? What next? Questions in time of anxiety and uncertainty. Walking the road to Emmaus in the presence of love.

 I don’t know what the future holds, but I know Who holds the future. — Ralph Abernathy

Be empty of worrying.
Think of who created thought!
Why do you stay in prison
When the door is so wide open?
― Mawlana Jalal-al-Din Rumi

It’s fun to think of the what-if. Scary, but fun. It’s like, I thought this door was closed before, but here it is open just the tiniest crack. What if? ― Jenny Han

Oswald Chambers wrote, “Before God can use us greatly, he must first hurt us deeply.” Every one of us has walked the Road to Emmaus. It is the loneliest road on earth–the highway from broken dreams to the place called What Am I Going To Do Next? When we walk the Road to Emmaus–and every one of us will–here’s what we need to remember: “Finite disappointments pave the road to infinite hope.” (I have just quoted the Reverend Martin Luther King.) — Robert Petterson

Finite disappointments pave the road to infinite hope. — Martin Luther King

Songs:

Questions to consider from journey to Emmaus:

  • Who walks with you?
  • Where do you walk in these times? What roads and journeys are closed off to you? Where have you gone instead?
  • Who, where or what is your ‘safe space’ or sanctuary in times like these?
  • What makes you turn around when you’re determined to leave something behind? Or to leave? What calls you to return?
  • What has changed your mind, opened your eyes?
  • What changes your focus from current events/news/headlines? What balances out that awareness?
  • What happens when what you expected is overturned? What helps you make sense of the situation and adapt?
  • What if love disappoints you, because it does what you didn’t expect?

For What Its Worth — Buffalo Springfield

There’s something happening here
What it is ain’t exactly clear
There’s a man with a gun over there
Telling me I got to beware

I think it’s time we stop, children, what’s that sound
Everybody look what’s going down

There’s battle lines being drawn
Nobody’s right if everybody’s wrong
Young people speaking their minds
Getting so much resistance from behind

It’s time we stop, hey, what’s that sound
Everybody look what’s going down

What a field-day for the heat
A thousand people in the street
Singing songs and carrying signs
Mostly say, hooray for our side

It’s s time we stop, hey, what’s that sound
Everybody look what’s going down

Paranoia strikes deep
Into your life it will creep
It starts when you’re always afraid
You step out of line, the man come and take you away

We better stop, hey, what’s that sound
Everybody look what’s going down
Stop, hey, what’s that sound
Everybody look what’s going down …

What If
 
I’m always wondering about the what-ifs, about the road not taken. ― Jenny Han
 
You’ll never get anywhere if you go about what-iffing like that. ― Roald Dahl
 
Never Kill your What Ifs, But first be Grateful for What Is. ― Wordions
 
Do you think I’ll let it go, that I’ll hide from it because you, who’s anything but a coward, is afraid of what ifs? ― Nora Roberts

Soul, if you want to learn secrets, your heart must forget about shame and dignity. You are God’s lover, yet you worry what people are saying. ― Rumi,
 
But what if I fail of my purpose here? It is but to keep the nerves at strain, to dry one’s eyes and laugh at a fall, and baffled, get up and begin again. — Robert Browning

Every day, think as you wake up, today I am fortunate to be alive, I have a precious human life, I am not going to waste it. I am going to use all my energies to develop myself, to expand my heart out to others; to achieve enlightenment for the benefit of all beings. I am going to have kind thoughts towards others, I am not going to get angry or think badly about others. I am going to benefit others as much as I can. ― The Dalai Lama

But suppose God is black? What if we go to Heaven and we, all our lives, have treated the Negro as an inferior, and God is there, and we look up and He is not white? What then is our response? — Robert Kennedy

Behind each door of what-if lies an unanswerable question that unhinges an infinite Rube Goldberg machine of probabilities. The life we have is the only one we will ever know, and even that with tenuous certainty. ― Maria Popova
 
You’ll always be my favourite “What If”. ― Nitya Prakash

Coming Forth Into the Light — Suzy Kassem

I was born the day
I thought:
What is?
What was?
And
What if?

I was transformed the day
My ego shattered,
And all the superficial, material
Things that mattered
To me before,
Suddenly ceased
To matter.

I really came into being
The day I no longer cared about
What the world thought of me,
Only on my thoughts for
Changing the world.


But what if you’re wrong?
What if there’s more?
What if there’s hope you never dreamed of hoping for?
What if you jump?
And just close your eyes?
What if the arms that catch you, catch you by surprise?
What if He’s more than enough?
What if it’s love?
― Nichole Nordeman

What Next?

You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, ‘I lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along.’ — Eleanor Roosevelt

Anytime you finish a climb, there’s always the next thing you can try. — Alex Honnold

When I talk to students – and I still think of myself more than anything as a kind of professor on leave – they say, ‘Well, how do I get to do what you do?’… And I say, ‘Well, you have to start out by being a failed piano major.’ And my point to them is don’t try to have a 10-year plan. Find the next thing that interests you and follow that. — Condoleezza Rice

Luke 24 Road to Emmaus Commentary
While we might be seeking a Christianity based in glory and triumph, Jesus is seeking us in the places he’s always been found, namely in human frailty, in human brokenness, in the unwashed masses. He’s wooing us in simple table fellowship, and contact with the unclean, and confronting the powers that be. — Nadia Bolz-Weber

The old news about Easter is that it is about resurrection. The new news may be that it is not so much about the resurrection of Jesus as it is about our own. Unfortunately, we so often miss it. Jesus, you see, is already gone from one tomb. The only question now is whether or not we are willing to abandon our own, leave the old trappings behind and live in the light … Consequently, Easter is not simply a day of celebration: It is, as well, a day of decision. What is really to be decided is whether or not we ourselves will rise from the deadening grip of this world’s burnt-out systems to the light-giving time of God’s coming again, this time in us. — Joan ChittisterThese disciples had lost so much more than just a friend. Their dream of what the kingdom of God would look like as they had imagined it…the hopes and dreams around which they had oriented the last three years of their life… the vision that had caused them to give up fishing and tax collecting and the like in order to commit themselves to following Jesus…it was all gone. Each one who had been a part of the community of Jesus now had to come to terms with life on the other side of the death of their wish dream. They had to figure out what to live for now that the vision that had brought order and purpose to their lives was no more. … They were suspended somewhere between loss and possible gain, grief and possible joy, profound human suffering and perhaps some kind of redemption, dashed hopes and maybe daring to hope again. They were wrung out—emotionally, spiritually and physically. They had been powerless to prevent the events of the last days, and they were powerless now to do anything to change their situation. The road from Jerusalem to Emmaus was the road between the now and the not-yet. — Richard Rohr

Do you ever wonder what the risen Christ looked like? No one knows. There are no selfies, no video or audio recordings. The Gospels attest to a series of post-resurrection appearances because someone returning from the dead was remarkable. But even more remarkably, no one seemed to recognize the earthly Jesus in the risen Christ—most notably the people who’d known him best. — M. E. Stortz, Gathr

But the disciples do one thing right in this story — something so apparently insignificant it would be easy to miss. They offer hospitality … Jesus blesses this small act of generosity with the revelation of his presence. In the breaking of the bread they at last recognize him … When we offer hospitality, God uses it not only as a means of serving those in need of refreshment, but also as an invitation for us to experience Jesus’ presence ourselves. — Theology of Work

It’s funny how worry and anxiety and disappointment can blind us from seeing what is right in front of our eyes. When the mind doesn’t believe something possible, it is hard for the senses to receive the information… The light of the world was right beside them, but to their eyes, the risen Lord just looked like a fellow traveler on the way to Emmaus. But Jesus met the disciples where they were at—walking away from Jerusalem, not believing the testimony of the empty tomb, and full of disappointment and anxiety. That’s exactly where Jesus shows up in our lives, too. It is so easy to believe that fears, worries, doubts, anxieties separate us from God, drive God away from us, disappoint Jesus and mean that we are somehow outside the family of God and circle of faith—but that is precisely where Jesus meets us, walks with us, engages us, loves us. And Jesus is not looking for an instant transformation—do you see in this story that building a relationship with Jesus is a process—a journey?! First, Jesus engages in conversation, and he listens to their worries. Second, Jesus teaches them and helps them to understand … Third, Jesus spent enough time with them … to start letting go of their anxiety and start having a new experience—their hearts … burned with a deep knowing, peace, and an experience of God’s love in that moment … Like these disciples on the road to Emmaus, the risen Lord meets us in our anxiety, melancholy or worry—and he journeys with us, building a relationship over time. As the old hymn says, “he walks with us and he talks, and he tells us we are his own.” So, bring your questions, bring your doubts, bring your anxieties, and fears, and worries. For Jesus meets us…  — Linda Anderson-Little

THIS WEEK with JCC and Around Town: April 14-19

Notes: 

  • Do you need support of any kind? We have volunteers ready to assist with errands (including with library’s Jackson Bridge listserv), access to emergency supplies, and Rev Gail is available for emotional and spiritual companionship. Call Rev Gail directly at 978.273.0308 or email the church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org
  • Jackson Public Library’s Guide to Online Services (activities, events, reading and information materials, etc)
  • Conway Daily Sun’s list of virtual THINGS to DO
  • Support Local Businesses doing Take Out. Complete list from Conway Daily Sun.

All Week: BUTTERFLY the CROSS
Jackson Community Church (sanctuary open 24/7)
You may add a butterfly to the cross, which will stand in the sanctuary, or take one home, if you need a symbol of hope. If you can’t be here, send us your prayers and we’ll add your butterfly for you.

TUE, April 14

  • Community Event: MT WASHINGTON OBSERVATORY’S VIRTUAL CLASSROOM (Facebook Live)
    11:15am • Mon, Tue, Fri @ Facebook Live
    Connect live to the highest peak in the Northeastern US, Mount Washington, New Hampshire, as Weather Observers and Education Specialists at the non-profit Mount Washington Observatory present a Facebook Live program called “Home of the World’s Worst Weather Live.”
  • Community Event: LIBRARY PICKUP HOURS
    2-6pm • Jackson Public Library
    Since staff are only in the building on those two days and for your safety, items will be pulled one day for pickup the following day. All book courier services have been cancelled so transfers and inter-library loans are not available at this time. If you want something we don’t have in our collection, please email us with the title, author, and what formats you will accept (eBook, downloadable audio, Kindle, paperback or hardcover, anything else).

WED, April 15

  • LIFT your SPIRITS (via ZOOM) – adult beverages
    6pm • ZOOM app link (email for password)
    Social gathering. Bring your favorite beverage and  lighten your spirits (and raise a glass). Teach us your favorite toast. Option: call in via touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID: 170985789.
  • COUNCIL MEETING (via ZOOM)
    7pm • Zoom (email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org for password)
    Meeting of church staff, officers & lay leaders to make decisions re church governance, mission and operations. Open meeting; anyone may attend. Teach us your favorite toast. Option: call in via touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, Meeting ID: 968 5393 252.

THURS, April 16

  • Community Event: SPRING EPHEMERALS (via ZOOM)
    7pm • ZOOM app link Join Executive Director Lori Kinsey for pictorial journey of early spring wildflowers.  From hepatica to Dutchman’s breeches we will look at what makes each flower unique, from its pollinators to its habitat.  More info.

FRI, April 17

  • BREAKFAST & CONVERSATION with REV GAIL (via ZOOM)
    8am • ZOOM app link (email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org for password)
    Call to talk & gather. Option: Call in via touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID: 170985789
  • Community Event: MT WASHINGTON OBSERVATORY’S VIRTUAL CLASSROOM (Facebook Live)
    11:15am • Mon, Tue, Fri @ Facebook Live
    Connect live to the highest peak in the Northeastern US, Mount Washington, New Hampshire, as Weather Observers and Education Specialists at the non-profit Mount Washington Observatory present a Facebook Live program called “Home of the World’s Worst Weather Live.”
  • HOLY CONVERSATIONS (with COCKTAILS) (ZOOM link)
    5pm • ZOOM app link (email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org for password)
  • Reflect on Christ’s appearances after Easter and cover some events leading toward Pentecost. This week we will consider the Road to Emmaus. Bring your favorite beverage & come ready to listen and share. Texts this week – Luke 24: 13-35 & Mark 16: 12-14. This will also be the text used for Sunday’s worship service. Option: Call in via touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID: 170985789. (email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org for password)

SAT, April 18

  • Community Event: LIBRARY PICKUP HOURS
    2-6pm • Jackson Public Library
    Because staff are only in the building on those two days and for your safety, items will be pulled on one day for pickup the following day. All book courier services have been cancelled so transfers and inter-library loans are not available at this time. If you want something we don’t have in our collection, please email us with the title, author, and what formats you will accept (eBook, downloadable audio, Kindle, paperback or hardcover, anything else).

SUN, April 19

  • INTERFAITH GATHERING (via ZOOM)
    8am • Zoom app link (email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org **by 7:30AM** for password – same link for choir rehearsal & 10:30am service)
    Gather for poetry, conversation, readings & prayer. Bring your own caffeine. 🙂 Option: Call on touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID# 142985761.
  • CHOIR PRACTICE (via ZOOM)
    9:15am • Zoom app link (email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org **by 7:30AM** for password – same link for choir rehearsal & 10:30am service)
    Choir practice with choir director Billy Carleton and music director Alan Labrie. Option: Call on touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID# 142985761.
  • VIRTUAL WORSHIP SERVICE (via ZOOM)
    10:30am • Zoom app link (email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org **by 7:30AM** for password)
    Join us for worship, special music, communal prayer, scripture, and reflection. Stay for virtual coffee hour. Service will also be live-streamed to website and Facebook (if technology supports this function on the day of event). Afterward, recordings of worship service will be posted to FacebookVimeo.com channel & Youtube.com channel. Option: Call on touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID# 142985761 (email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org for password)
  • VIRTUAL COFFEE HOUR
    Stay after worship and we will break into small groups for brief social opportunity. Same link as worship.

Cecelia A. “Ceal” (Tirabassi) Peacock

Cecelia A. “Ceal” (Tirabassi) Peacock, 79, of Bartlett, N.H., and formerly of Topsfield, Mass., passed away peacefully Thursday morning, April 2, 2020, at the home of her son, Tom, in Boxford, Mass., surrounded by the love of her family.

Cecelia A. “Ceal” (Tirabassi) Peacock

Cecelia was born in Everett, Mass., on Aug. 12, 1940, to the late Thomas and Alma (Strianese) Tirabassi. The oldest of three, she was raised and educated in Everett and was a communicant of St. Anthony Church in Everett.

During her younger years, Cecelia was an active member of the CYO. Cecelia retired from North Shore Community College (Beverly) in 2002 and then moved to Bartlett, where she restarted her life to meet so many more amazing people. Cecelia continued her love of skiing and soon afterwards she became a longtime ski instructor and enjoyed being outdoors, especially, hiking, biking, snowshoeing, sailing, swimming and gardening.

Cecelia was the beloved wife of the late, Walter E. Peacock and is survived by their sons, Gregg Cordwell of Grand Junction, Colo.; Thomas Peacock of Boxford; and John Peacock of Winchester, Mass.; and daughters of St. Johns, New Brunswick, Debbie (Peacock) Hilchey, Susan (Peacock) Foster and Bliss Fulton. Cecelia is survived by her sister, Barbara (Tirabassi) Ash of Seabrook, N.H.

Cecelia was predeceased by her brother, Thomas Tirabassi Jr.

Cecelia is survived by her grandchildren, Michael Foster, Angela Foster, Dennis Cordwell-Graf, Matthew Peacock, Bradley Peacock, Mark Peacock and Samuel Peacock, Michael Fulton, Ricky Fulton and Jennifer Fulton.

Cecelia was predeceased by her grandson, Michael Cordwell-Graf.

The Peacock Family wishes to honor their Mom privately. Please keep the family in your thoughts and prayers during this difficult time. For those who wish, Cecelia may be remembered through donations to Jen’s Friend (jensfriends.org), Tin Mountain Conservatory (tinmountain.org) or to Mount Washington Valley Trail Association (mwvrecpath.org). To share a memory of Cecelia with her family, please go to cgfuneralhomegeorgetown.com.

The Conte-Giamberardino Funeral Home at 14 Pleasant St. in Georgetown, Mass., has been entrusted with Cecelia’s care

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