From Jackson eNews: Boston Post Cane awarded to Warren Schomaker

Boston Post Cane awarded to Warren Schomaker

The Jackson selectmen awarded Warren Schomaker the Boston Post Cane at their meeting July 27, 2021. In 1909 the Boston Post, in a publicity effort, sent 700 gold-headed ebony canes to towns in MA, RI, ME, and NH to be given to the oldest resident of the town. Most of the canes have been lost over the years, however Jackson still has its original cane, which is stored in the Town Office. A replica cane is given to the recipient.

Warren Schomaker, aged 97, was born in Sydney, Australia, on January 27, 1924. His mother, Ivy Emma Hill, was from Braidwood, New South Wales, Australia. His father, George, was born in 1885 in a covered wagon travelling west from Chicago on the trail to Oregon. His birth was registered in Seattle, Washington.

Warren came to America in 1945 and secured his first job with Stromberg Carlson, a maker of telephone equipment, in Rochester, NY. While in Rochester, Warren and a partner formed Utility Services, Inc. in 1955 to acquire its first small telephone company in Melvin Village, NH. More acquisitions were made in Indiana, Illinois, Minnesota, Montana, and South Dakota. In 1960 Warren and 2 partners formed Continental Telephone Corporation, later renamed Contel. During the next 10 years, more than 110 acquisitions were made in 42 states, Barbados, Trinidad/Tobago, Jamaica, Grenada, Grand Bahama, Quebec, and Ontario. Contel went public in 1964.

In 1996, Warren and Leslie moved from Kennebunkport to Jackson. Having been president of the Kennebunkport Historical Society, Warren was interested in joining the Jackson Historical Society. Under his leadership, with the help of many, accomplishments of the Society have been numerous and have placed it in the enviable position it holds today. Just a few accomplishments include:

  • Getting 17 structures named to the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Staging a year-long bicentennial celebration
  • Helping the grammar school kids create a time capsule, which is stored at the Society
  • Erecting the Korean War monument
  • Creating the Memorial Walk to the Town Offices.
  • Restoring the old snow roller across from the Wentworth
  • Paying for the paving of the Old Town Hall (before the Society was using it) and purchasing the chairs now at the Whitney Center
  • Restoring the Town Hall – new roof, upstairs egress, new siding, new wiring, general renovations
  • Publishing numerous books of historic interest.
  • Making 19th century White Mountain Art a focus of the society, with lectures, exhibitions, and art sales, and creating the Museum of White Mountain Art upstairs in the Town Hall.
  • Commissioning a replica of the Town’s Boston Post Cane and having a case made for the original.

The stunning new library is a prime example of the Society working with other organizations and the entire community. The Society saved the timbers of the historic Trickey barn, which was scheduled to be demolished to make way for the Whitney Center, and stored them in trailers for a future use.  They were later donated to the Town for the library.  Building the library was a town-wide project with many people, young and old, involved. Once building plans were complete, Sam Harding was the general coordinator; Carrie Scribner mobilized the children; Michael Weeder was the master builder.  

Anne Pillion noted “Warren Schomaker, through both his extraordinary vision and getting-it-done abilities, is a shining example of how one person can accomplish far-reaching and long-lasting community benefits. We thank Warren for his years of tireless work, generous support, valuable expertise, entrepreneurial leadership, and unsurpassed dedication on behalf of the Society and the Town of Jackson.”

This Week at JCC and around town: July 20-25

Highlights: Hike, fitness class, yoga, MWV Jewish film forum, music at local venues & Music under the Tent (library), Awareness in Sanctuary series (Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation), C3 conversation, shabbat service, worship and more

TUE, July 20

  • Community Event: CHAIR YOGA – A Healthier You with Anjali Rose
    9:15am • Zoom. (Zoom pre-registration link)
    6-week series/online class sponsored by the Friends of the Whitney Center. We explore various exercises to improve posture, balance and strength using the core weight of the body and light hand weights. This fun and insightful class is for all ages and abilities. Simply bring a chair, two blocks, a strap and light hand weights.
  • CLERGY LUNCH
    12:30-2pm • Zoom.
    Meeting of Clergy of the Eastern Slope for peer work and community networking. Rev Gail attends.
  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    10am-7pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org

WED, July 21

  • FITNESS with LAURIE McALEER
    9am • JCC Parish House (in-person)
    Join us for a free, gentle fitness class. Please let Laurie McAleer know you will attend. Masking and social distancing required.
  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    2-5pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org
  • Community Event: FLOW & ALIGN YOGA with Anjali Rose
    5pm • Zoom. (Zoom Pre-registration link)
    Class sponsored by the Friends of the Whitney Center. We will explore the body, mind and soul with mindful movement. These yoga classes are intentionally created with sequences to instill strength, flexibility and mobility. This fun and community oriented class is for all ages and abilities. Simply bring a mat, strap, block and blanket.
  • Community Event: WHITE MOUNTAIN CEILI BAND
    5:30 – 9pm • Wildcat Tavern Dinner reservations required: 800-228-4245 or 603-383-4245.
    The musicians will play on the porch of the Igloo a safe distance from guests and vice versa. Join Michael Levine (guitar), Dexter Harding (tenor banjo), Siena Kaplan-Thompson (fiddle) & Fiona Howell (flute) for traditional Irish Session music. Stomp your feet, clap your hands, and dance a little jig as these accomplished musicians play centuries old tunes. For more information on the White Mountain Ceili Band visit: whitemountainceiliband.com

THURS, July 22

  • Community Event: NATURALIST LED HIKE in JACKSON
  • 10am • Tin Mountain Conservation Center Field Station, Jackson
    Registration required link. Or call Call 447-6991.
    Join Tin Mountain Conservation Center for weekly hikes at the Jackson Field Station property every Thursday in July & August. Highlights include the summit of Tin Mountain, a tin mine on the property, and historic homestead, and a mountain pond. Tin Mountain’s naturalist will explain the historic use of the property, help identify plant species, and point out animal signs. These hikes are a great way to explore the lesser trod trails of the White Mountains and avoid the crowds. Participants of all ages welcome.
  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    10am-7pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org
  • Community Service: WAY STATION SHIFT
    1pm • Food pickup
    2:30pm • Curbside package preparation
    5pm • Shift at curbside with guests
    @ 15 Grove St, North Conway, NH
    Rev Gail and JCC volunteers serve this weekly outreach to local homeless and housing-insecure residents.
  • Community Event: WHITE MOUNTAINS JEWISH FILM FORUM – AMERICAN PASTORAL
    7:30pm • Register (required) here: Registration Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ0ode-gpzwqHNMrAgWIy847oogkB4MPSZ2A  Watch the film first on Amazon Prime, Apple TV, YouTube, ahead of time on your own and then join the group at 7:30pm for a conversation led by author Benjamin Taylor. From Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation: A film based on the novel of the same name by Philip Roth: Seymour “Swede” Levov comes of age just after World War II, in a thriving and triumphant America. A legendary high school athlete, the diligent and successful inheritor of his father’s glove factory, the proprietor of an eighteenth-century stone house in the heart of WASP country, the devoted husband of a beautiful and intelligent wife, and the father of a charming daughter, the Swede appears to have fulfilled the ambitions of generations of struggling forebears. But his carefully constructed life begins to collapse as he and America face the challenges of the turbulent sixties, and he sees his adored daughter, Merry, turn first into a rebellious adolescent and then into a revolutionary terrorist. As Swede Levov watches in bewilderment everything he treasures, everything so industriously created by his family over the course of three generations, is blown up by an angry girl’s bomb. American Pastoral is a wrenching and cathartic piece of work. It is a book about America: about loving and hating it, about wanting to belong and refusing to belong.

FRI, July 23

  • Community Event: AWARENESS in the SANCTUARY — Deep Eyes
    9:30-10:a5am • Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation, Bethlehem, NH / Zoom
    Led by Jacki Katzman, Movement Mentor, BHC member and Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioner®.
    Registration Required for All participants. Registration link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUode2rqjkqGtZyCr28HqH3tWbTa1ZGTvRX Questions? Please contact Jacki – jackisue@aol.com. Upcoming sessions:  July 30 – Resting on Inside Eyes, August 6 – Prayer Hand Eyes – Direct Your Attention. A donation to the Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation for the 4-lesson series ($50), or $15 per single session, will be appreciated. Participants  have the option of Zoom or in-person attendance in the sanctuary. Open your eyes to fresh perspectives, guided by principles of the Feldenkrais Method. “Fresh Perspective” begins with a topical reading selected by Rabbi Donna Kirshbaum followed by a guided, body-based meditation. Lessons are appropriate for people of all abilities, body types, levels of fitness, faiths and spiritual orientations. .
  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    2-5pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org
  • C3: COCKTAILS & CHRISTIAN CONVERSATIONS (zoom link)
    5pm • Zoom link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83028442916
    Option: Call in via touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866 Meeting ID: 83028442916 (#)
    Conversation about this week’s scripture.
  • Community Event: SHABBAT SERVICE
    6pm • In-Person @ Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation Sanctuary & Via Zoom
    To join us on Zoom, please register here: bhcsynagogue1920@gmail.com
  • Community Event: MUSIC at SHANNON DOOR: Mike Malkin & Becca Deschenes
    Evening • Shannon Door

SAT, July 24

  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    10am-2pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org
  • Community Event: GARDEN STAGE CONCERT SERIES – TYLER JAMES KELLY
    Evening • Wildcat Tavern
    Link: Tickets and reservations required.
    https://www.wildcattavern.com/events/the-garden-stage-dinner-concert-series-with-tyler-james-kelly/ Two shows per night, 4:30p-6:30p (Seating 3:45p), 7p-9p (6:45p Seating), Tables have a max of 6 people, All Events are 21 years and older only.
  • Community Event: MUSIC at SHANNON DOOR: Bobby Sheehan & Jeremy Holden
    Evening • Shannon Door

SUN, July 25

  • INTERFAITH GATHERING (ZOOM & IN-PERSON)
    8am • Pavilion behind Whitney Community Center & Zoom
    Zoom link required; Email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org for info.. Join us for poetry, prayer and conversation.
  • VIRTUAL WORSHIP (ZOOM & IN-PERSON)
    10:30am •  Zoom link required; Email jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org for info.
    • Join us for worship with music, scripture, prayer and reflection.
    • Live music by Alan Labrie
    • Message with Rev Gail Doktor
    • Stay for virtual coffee hour (via Zoom only).
    • Singing in community now practiced.
    • In-person attendance requires social distancing, masking requested for non-vaccinated individuals.
    • Service will also be live-streamed to website and Facebook (if technology supports this function on the day of event). Afterward, recordings of worship service will be posted to FacebookVimeo.com channel & Youtube.com channel.
  • Community Resource: MUSIC under the TENT – Shana Aisenberg (Appalachian & Contra Dance Fiddle)
    4pm • Jackson Library tent and lawn
    Bring chairs and a picnic. Come early for space under the tent.
  • Community Event: MUSIC at SHANNON DOOR: Bobby Sheehan & Jeremy Holden
    Evening • Shannon Door

Meditations on blindness and sight, perception and awareness: songs, prayers, poems and brief commentary on themes that rise up in John 9

I think we all suffer from acute blindness at times. Life is a constant journey of trying to open your eyes. I’m just beginning my journey, and my eyes aren’t fully open yet. — Olivia Thirlby

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind … — William Shakespeare

I have looked into your eyes with my eyes. I have put my heart near your heart. — Pope John XXIII
Songs about ‘Blindness’:
Blind Leading the Blind by Mumford & Sons (rock)
Blind Fools by Megan Davies & Curtis Peoples (country)
I Am Free by Newsboys (Christian rock)
I Go Blind by Hootie & The Blowfish (rock)
I Wish I Were Blind by Bruce Springsteen (rock)
Seeing Blind by Niall Horan & Maren Morris (country)
Sky Blue by Peter Gabriel with Blind Boys of Alabama (ballad/gospel)
Blind Boy by Musical Youth (pop)
Loving Blind by Clint Smith (country)
Love Is Blind by David Coverdale/Whitesnake (rock)
Lord You’ve Been Good To Me by 5 Blind Boys (gospel)
He Saw It All by the Booth Brothers (Christian country)
If You Me To by Ginny Owens (Christian)
Live Music with Blind Boys of Alabama (gospel)
Blind Man by Aerosmith (rock)
Blind Love by Tom Waits (country)
You’re Blind by Run/DMC (rock/rap)
Blind by Dababy (rap – includes explicit lyrics/some cursing)

Songs about Sight & Seeing: My Father’s Eyes by Eric Clapton (rock)
Have You Ever Seen the Rain? by Creedance Clearwater Revival (country/rock)
Doctor My Eyes by Jackson Browne (rock)
Look at Me by Sarah Vaughan (jazz/blues)
I Only Have Eyes for You by The Flamingos (rock/soul)
The Light In Your Eyes by LeAnn Rimes (country)
When I Look at the World by U2
I Look to You by Whitney Houston (rock)
The Way You Look Tonight by Frank Sinatra (jazz/big band)
Eyes Open by Taylor Swift (pop)
Close Your Eyes by Meghan Trainor (country)
Fresh Eyes by Andy Grammer (pop)
In Your Eyes by Peter Gabriel (rock ballad)
Don’t Close Your Eyes cover by Tim McGraw
In Another’s Eyes by Trisha Yearwood & Garth Brooks (country)
In My Daughter’s Eyes by Martina McBride
Sue Looks Good to Me by Alicia Keys (pop)
Look It Here by Public Enemy (rap)
Look Me In the Heart by Tina Turner (rock)
Look at Me Now by Kirk Franklin (rock/rap/gospel)
Can’t Take My Eyes Off of You by Frankie Valli (rock)
Close Your Eyes by Peaches & Herb & again Close Your Eyes The Five Keys (soul/rock)
Total Eclipse of the Heart by Bonnie Tyler (rock ballad)
When I Look in Your Eyes by Firehouse (rock)
Close Your Eyes by Michael Buble (pop)
Close My Eyes Forever by Ozzy Osbourne & Lita Ford (rock ballad)
Take a Look at Me Now (Against All Odds) by Phil Collins (pop ballad)
Angel Eyes by the Jeff Healey Band (rock)
My Eyes Have Seen You and I Looked at You by The Doors (rock)
Sight for Sore Eyes by Aerosmith (rock)
Look at Me Now by Charlies Puth (pop)
Ocean Eyes by Billie Eilish
The Way I Am by Ingrid Michaelson (pop ballad)
The Eyes of a Woman by Journey (rock)

PRAYER by Richard Rohr
God of all Light and Truth, just make sure that I am not a blind man or woman.
Keep me humble and honest, and that will be more than enough work for you.

PRAYER by Nadia Bolz-Weber
God of desert prophets and unlikely messiahs, humble us.
Show us that there is more to see than what we look for.
More possibility. More love. More forgiveness …
Restore our sight so that we may see you in each other.

PRAYER by St Augustine
Late have I loved you, O beauty ever ancient, ever new.
Late have I loved you. You have called to me, and have called out,
and have shattered my deafness. You have blazed forth with light and
have put my blindness to flight! You have sent forth fragrance,
and I have drawn in my breath, and I pant after you.
I have tasted you, and I hunger and thirst after you.
You have touched me, and I have burned for your peace.

At the End of the Day: A Mirror of Questions — John O’Donohue
What dreams did I create last night?
Where did my eyes linger today?
Where was I blind?
Where was I hurt without anyone noticing?
What did I learn today?
What did I read?
What new thoughts visited me?
What differences did I notice in those closest to me?
Whom did I neglect?
Where did I neglect myself?
What did I begin today that might endure?
How were my conversations?
What did I do today for the poor and the excluded?
Did I remember the dead today?
When could I have exposed myself to the risk of something different?
Where did I allow myself to receive love?
With whom today did I feel most myself?
What reached me today? How did it imprint?
Who saw me today?
What visitations hd I from the past and from the future?
What did I avoid today?
From the evidence – why was I given this day?

RICHARD ROHR COMMENTARY   (from Center for Action & Contemplation)
Finally, the great theater-piece Gospel is about a man born blind. … We can only touch upon the surface here, but enough to point you beneath the surface, I hope. Let me list in quick succession the major themes so you cannot miss them: 

  • The “man born blind” is the archetype for all of us at the beginning of life’s journey.
  • The moral blame game as to why or who caused human suffering is a waste of time.
  • The man does not even ask to be healed. It is just offered and given.
  • Religious authorities are often more concerned about control and correct theology than actually healing people. They are presented as narrow and unloving people throughout the story.
  • Many people have their spiritual conclusions before the facts in front of them. He is a predefined “sinner” and has no credibility for them.
  • Belief in and love of Jesus come after the fact, subsequent to the healing. Perfect faith or motivation is not always a prerequisite for God’s action. Sometimes God does things for God’s own purposes.
  • Spirituality is about seeing. Sin is about blindness, or as Saint Gregory of Nyssa will say, “Sin is always a refusal to grow.”
  • The one who knows little, learns much (what we call “beginner’s mind”) and those who have all their answers already, learn nothing.

Doing as others told me, I was Blind.
Coming when others called me, I was Lost.
Then I left everyone, myself as well.
Then I found Everyone, Myself as well.
― Rumi

COMMENTARY on the STORY of the BLIND MAN

… Of the two choices, Jesus picked a third, unbinding sin from the body, deformity from purity.  Before sight was restored, God’s presence was invoked in this marginal space, this “inappropriate” body.  God’s presence was invoked within the blind man – within the “imperfect”, within the “other”.  And when his eyes were opened, God’s light came pouring out from this man, casting into stark relief the social and religious ideas that had kept him out for so long. — Eliza (UCC minister see full posting on her blog)

Jesus doesn’t ask the blind guy when he heals him what he’ll be looking at for the rest of his life. — Anne Lamott

It will make a weak man mighty. it will make a mighty man fall. It will fill your heart and hands or leave you with nothing at all. It’s the eyes for the blind and legs for the lame. It is the love for hate and pride for shame. That’s the power of the gospel. — Ben Harper

It was here in the midst of my own community of underside dwellers that I couldn’t help but begin to see the Gospel, the life-changing reality that God is not far off, but here among the brokenness of our lives. — Nadia Bolz-Weber

ON SEEING & BLINDNESS as STATES of SPIRITUAL PERCEPTION

It’s not like ‘I once was blind, and now can see’: it’s more like, ‘I once was blind and now I have really bad vision’. — Nadia Bolz-Weber

Optimism does not mean being blind to the actual reality of a situation. It means maintaining a positive spirit to continue to seek a solution to any given problem. And it means recognizing that any given situation has many different aspects—positive as well as problematic. — Dalai Lama

We are only as blind as we want to be. ― Maya Angelou

Spirituality doesn’t mean a blind belief in a spiritual teaching. Spirituality is a practice that brings relief, communication, and transformation. Everyone needs a spiritual dimension in life. Without a spiritual dimension, it’s very challenging to be with the daily difficulties we all encounter. With a spiritual practice, you’re no longer afraid. Along with your physical body, you have a spiritual body. The practices of breathing, walking, concentration, and understanding can help you greatly in dealing with your emotions, in listening to and embracing your suffering, and in helping you to recognize and embrace the suffering of another person. If we have this capacity, then we can develop a real and lasting spiritual intimacy with ourselves and with others. ― Thich Nhat Hanh

Had the price of looking been blindness, I would have looked. — Ralph Ellison

Blindness is an unfortunate handicap but true vision does not require the eyes. — Helen Keller

Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see. — Mark Twain

Our very eyes, Are sometimes, like our judgments, blind. — William Shakespeare

There are not sacred and profane things, places, and moments. There are only sacred and desecrated things, places, and moments-and it is we alone who desecrate them by our blindness and lack of reverence. It is one sacred universe, and we are all a part of it. — Richard Rohr

Man’s basic vice, the source of all his evils, is the act of unfocusing his mind, the suspension of his consciousness, which is not blindness, but the refusal to see, not ignorance, but the refusal to know. — Ayn Rand

An eye for an eye leaves everybody blind. — Martin Luther King, Jr.

NOBEL SPEECH (excerpt from FULL LECTURE) by Toni Morrison
“Once upon a time there was an old woman. Blind but wise.” Or was it an old man? A guru, perhaps. Or a griot soothing restless children. I have heard this story, or one exactly like it, in the lore of several cultures. “Once upon a time there was an old woman. Blind. Wise.”
      In the version I know the woman is the daughter of slaves, black, American, and lives alone in a small house outside of town. Her reputation for wisdom is without peer and without question. Among her people she is both the law and its transgression. The honor she is paid and the awe in which she is held reach beyond her neighborhood to places far away; to the city where the intelligence of rural prophets is the source of much amusement.
     One day the woman is visited by some young people who seem to be bent on disproving her clairvoyance and showing her up for the fraud they believe she is. Their plan is simple: they enter her house and ask the one question the answer to which rides solely on her difference from them, a difference they regard as a profound disability: her blindness. They stand before her, and one of them says, “Old woman, I hold in my hand a bird. Tell me whether it is living or dead.”
     She does not answer, and the question is repeated. “Is the bird I am holding living or dead?”
Still she doesn’t answer. She is blind and cannot see her visitors, let alone what is in their hands. She does not know their color, gender or homeland. She only knows their motive.
     The old woman’s silence is so long, the young people have trouble holding their laughter.
     Finally she speaks and her voice is soft but stern. “I don’t know”, she says. “I don’t know whether the bird you are holding is dead or alive, but what I do know is that it is in your hands. It is in your hands.”
     Her answer can be taken to mean: if it is dead, you have either found it that way or you have killed it. If it is alive, you can still kill it. Whether it is to stay alive, it is your decision. Whatever the case, it is your responsibility.
     For parading their power and her helplessness, the young visitors are reprimanded, told they are responsible not only for the act of mockery but also for the small bundle of life sacrificed to achieve its aims. The blind woman shifts attention away from assertions of power to the instrument through which that power is exercised…

I look at the worldLangston Hughes

I look at the world
From awakening eyes in a black face—
And this is what I see:
This fenced-off narrow space   
Assigned to me.
 
I look then at the silly walls
Through dark eyes in a dark face—
And this is what I know:
That all these walls oppression builds
Will have to go!
 
I look at my own body   
With eyes no longer blind—
And I see that my own hands can make
The world that’s in my mind.
Then let us hurry, comrades,
The road to find.

Sonnet 19: When I consider how my light is spent — John Milton

When I consider
how my light is spent,
Ere half my days,
in this dark world and wide,
And that one Talent
which is death to hide
Lodged with me useless,
though my Soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker,
and present
My true account,
lest he returning chide;
‘Doth God exact day-labour,
light denied?’
I fondly ask.
But patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies,
‘God doth not need
Either man’s work
or his own gifts;
who best
Bear his mild yoke,
they serve him best.
His state
Is Kingly.
Thousands at his bidding speed
And post o’er Land and
Ocean without rest:
They also serve who only
stand and wait.’

This Week with JCC and around town: July 13-18

This week: Hikes (Tin Mountain & USVLT), Canoe for a Cause (Upper Saco Valley Land Trust/USVLT), garden tours (MWV Garden Club members only), fitness class, zoom yoga, forest yoga, film festival, Irish music & jazz (Wildcat Tavern), Music under the Tent (library), Awareness in Sanctuary series (Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation), C3 conversation, shabbat service, worship and more

TUE, July 13

  • Community Event: CHAIR YOGA – A Healthier You with Anjali Rose
    9:15am • Zoom. (Zoom pre-registration link)
    6-week series/online class sponsored by the Friends of the Whitney Center. We explore various exercises to improve posture, balance and strength using the core weight of the body and light hand weights. This fun and insightful class is for all ages and abilities. Simply bring a chair, two blocks, a strap and light hand weights.
  • CLERGY LUNCH
    12:30-2pm • Zoom.
    Meeting of Clergy of the Eastern Slope for peer work and community networking. Rev Gail attends.
  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    10am-7pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org
  • DEACONS MEETING
    7pm • Zoom link required for virtual attendance. Email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org

WED, July 14

  • FITNESS with LAURIE McALEER
    9am • JCC Parish House (in-person)
    Join us for a free, gentle fitness class. Please let Laurie McAleer know you will attend. Masking and social distancing required.
  • Community Event: PADDLE for a CAUSE
    All Day • Saco Canoe Rental Company
    Upper Saco Valley Land Trust is the featured non-profit for Saco Canoe Rental Company’s Paddle for a Cause on Wednesday, July 14. A portion of the proceeds from every canoe and kayak rental will be donated to USVLT. Invite your friends and go to www.sacocanoerental.com to book your river trip.
  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    2-5pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org
  • Community Event: FLOW & ALIGN YOGA with Anjali Rose
    5pm • Zoom. (Zoom Pre-registration link)
    Class sponsored by the Friends of the Whitney Center. We will explore the body, mind and soul with mindful movement. These yoga classes are intentionally created with sequences to instill strength, flexibility and mobility. This fun and community oriented class is for all ages and abilities. Simply bring a mat, strap, block and blanket.
  • Community Event: WHITE MOUNTAIN CEILI BAND
    5:30 – 9pm • Wildcat Tavern Dinner reservations required: 800-228-4245 or 603-383-4245.
    The musicians will play on the porch of the Igloo a safe distance from guests and vice versa. Join Michael Levine (guitar), Dexter Harding (tenor banjo), Siena Kaplan-Thompson (fiddle) & Fiona Howell (flute) for traditional Irish Session music. Stomp your feet, clap your hands, and dance a little jig as these accomplished musicians play centuries old tunes. For more information on the White Mountain Ceili Band visit: whitemountainceiliband.com

THURS, July 15

  • Community Event: GARDEN POLLINATORS FIELD PROGRAM
    10am & 11:15am • Albany
    Advance registration required. 10am: Link to register. 11:15am: Link to register. Or call 447-6991.
    Gardens are abuzz with activity this time of year, with pollinators flitting from bloom to bloom in search of nectar. But which insects are attracted to which plants and how do pollination strategies differ? Join Tin Mountain for this unique garden pollinator field program led by Debra Marnich, soil conservationist with NRCS, and Alina Harris, Integrated Pest and Pollinator Management Specialist with the Xerces Society. We will explore what is growing and who it is attracting as well as cover tips and techniques to making your gardens more pollinator-friendly.
  • Community Event: NATURALIST LED HIKE in JACKSON
    10am • Tin Mountain Conservation Center Field Station, Jackson
    Registration required link. Or call Call 447-6991.
    Join Tin Mountain Conservation Center for weekly hikes at the Jackson Field Station property every Thursday in July & August. Highlights include the summit of Tin Mountain, a tin mine on the property, and historic homestead, and a mountain pond. Tin Mountain’s naturalist will explain the historic use of the property, help identify plant species, and point out animal signs. These hikes are a great way to explore the lesser trod trails of the White Mountains and avoid the crowds. Participants of all ages welcome.
  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    10am-7pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org
  • Community Service: WAY STATION SHIFT
    1pm • Food pickup
    2:30pm • Curbside package preparation
    5pm • Shift at curbside with guests
    @ 15 Grove St, North Conway, NH
    Rev Gail and JCC volunteers serve this weekly outreach to local homeless and housing-insecure residents.
  • Community Event: WHITE MOUNTAINS JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL – SARAH’s KEY
    7:30pm • Register (required) here: Registration Link:  https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZIkcuCpqT0sGd1ZLG2J5ce2dB1rm9wYnkXW See the film ahead of time on your own and then join the group at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, July 15, to welcome Professor Sara Horowitz for a full discussion of this film event.
    • Sarah’s Key, based on the book by Tatiana de Rosnay, revolves around an American journalist, Julia Jarmond played by Kristin Scott Thomas. Julia ends up entangled in her research about the Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup in France, 1942. She uncovers the story of a girl named Sarah and develops an increasing interest in Sarah’s past as it slowly twists into her own future.
    • Movies of World War Two are endless. But Sarah’s Key tells a unique story from the French perspective rather than the German or American. Although there are other films and documentaries on the Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup, this movie builds a personal story to really illuminate the ramifications of this dark chapter in French history.

FRI, July 16

  • Community Event: AWARENESS in the SANCTUARY — Opening to Fresh Perspectives
    9:30-10:a5am • Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation, Bethlehem, NH / Zoom
    Led by Jacki Katzman, Movement Mentor, BHC member and Guild Certified Feldenkrais Practitioner®.
    Registration Required for All participants. Registration link: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZUode2rqjkqGtZyCr28HqH3tWbTa1ZGTvRX Questions? Please contact Jacki – jackisue@aol.com. Upcoming sessions: July 16 – Faraway Eyes – find internal depths, July 23 – Deep Eyes – where you look from matters, July 30 – Resting on Inside Eyes, August 6 – Prayer Hand Eyes – Direct Your Attention. A donation to the Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation for the 4-lesson series ($50), or $15 per single session, will be appreciated. Participants  have the option of Zoom or in-person attendance in the sanctuary. Open your eyes to fresh perspectives, guided by principles of the Feldenkrais Method. “Fresh Perspective” begins with a topical reading selected by Rabbi Donna Kirshbaum followed by a guided, body-based meditation. Lessons are appropriate for people of all abilities, body types, levels of fitness, faiths and spiritual orientations. .
  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    2-5pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org
  • C3: COCKTAILS & CHRISTIAN CONVERSATIONS 
    5pm • Zoom link required for virtual attendance. Email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org
    Conversation about this week’s scripture.
  • Community Event: SHABBAT SERVICE 7pm • In-Person @ Bethlehem Hebrew Congregation Sanctuary & Via Zoom To join us on Zoom, please register here: bhcsynagogue1920@gmail.com

SAT, July 17

  • Community Event: HIKE DUNDEE – Past & Future
    9am – Noon • Jackson-Bartlett Town Line on Dundee Rd.
    Registration required: email info@usvlt.org.
    The Dundee Community Forest project encompasses fields and forests that were once a thriving farming community. Explore its history, and forces both economic and environmental that brought transitions to the landscape. Board members Peter Benson and Ann Bennett will lead this walking tour along the Dundee Road from the Jackson-Bartlett town line north to the Ham House (several steep hills, otherwise a rolling 3 miles round trip).   
  • Private Event: GARDEN TOURS (Members Only)
    10am-4pm • Varied Locations in Mt Washington Valley
    Locations available only to members of Mountain Garden Club.
  • Community Resource: LIBRARY OPEN
    10am-2pm • Jackson Library
    • Return to full hours of Tu&Th 10-7, W&F 2-5, Sa 10-2. We will continue to close on Sunday for the time being.
    • Masks and distance will be strictly required while in the building. If you’re unable to mask, you can still take advantage of our pickup or delivery service – simply let us know what you need.
    • One family at a time in the kids room.
    • Bathrooms and meeting room remain closed.
    • Contact the library for additional help: 603.383.9731 or by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org
  • Community Event: GARDEN STAGE CONCERT SERIES – DUKE ROBILLARD
    Evening • Wildcat Tavern
    Link: Tickets and reservations required.
    Duke’s Resume is decorated with Grammy nominations, Handy Awards and Blues Music Awards, and other honors for his artistry, recordings and productions within the United States and internationally. On his latest release, “Duke Robillard and his Dames of Rhythm” on M.C. Records, he wields an acoustic archtop and joins six thrushes for evocative and enjoyable renditions of 1920s and 1930s swing tunes; it’s a worthy successor to his 2016 BMA-winning “The Acoustic Blues And Roots Of Duke Robillard.” Two shows per night, 4:30p-6:30p (Seating 3:45p), 7p-9p (6:45p Seating), Tables have a max of 6 people, All Events are 21 years and older only.

SUN, July 18

  • INTERFAITH GATHERING
    8am • In-Person @ Pavilion behind Whitney Community Center & Zoom
    Zoom link required for virtual attendance. Email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org. Join us for poetry, prayer and conversation. Zoom-only.
  • Community Event: PINE HILL COMMUNITY FOREST YOGA
    8am • On-site
    Space is limited; reservations required. Please email info@usvlt.org to register.
    Join local yoga instructor Sue Faunce and USVLT Board members at the Pine Hill Community Forest. Our time will consist of a mindful morning walk by the river, with an emphasis on the senses and being present in nature. Arriving at our spot on the shore, we will enjoy a gentle yoga practice, about 45 minutes long and a brief period of quiet space for meditation or just enjoying the surroundings. Bring some water, and a towel or mat (it will be on sand).
  • VIRTUAL WORSHIP (Zoom) & IN-PERSON
    10:30am •  Zoom link required for virtual attendance. Email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org
    • Join us for worship with music, scripture, prayer and reflection.
    • Live music by Alan Labrie
    • Message with Rev Gail Doktor
    • Stay for virtual coffee hour (via Zoom only).
    • Singing in community now practiced.
    • In-person attendance requires social distancing, masking requested for non-vaccinated individuals.
    • Service will also be live-streamed to website and Facebook (if technology supports this function on the day of event). Afterward, recordings of worship service will be posted to FacebookVimeo.com channel & Youtube.com channel.
  • Private Event: GARDEN TOURS (Members Only)
    10am-4pm • Varied Locations in Mt Washington Valley
    Locations available only to members of Mountain Garden Club.
  • Community Resource: MUSIC under the TENT
    4pm • Jackson Library tent and lawn
    This week’s band is Shark Martin. Bring chairs and a picnic. Come early for space under the tent.
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