Author : jacksonnhcc

Meditation on seeing and blindness: themes from Mark. To what are you called to bear witness? When and how have you been blind in your life, and what or who opened your eyes?

I think we all suffer from acute blindness at times. Life is a constant journey of trying to open your eyes. I’m just beginning my journey, and my eyes aren’t fully open yet. — Olivia Thirlby

Love looks not with the eyes, but with the mind … — William Shakespeare

Helping, fixing, and serving represent three different ways of seeing life. When you help, you see life as weak. When you fix, you see life as broken. When you serve, you see life as whole. ― Joan Halifax

I have looked into your eyes with my eyes. I have put my heart near your heart. — Pope John XXIII


Songs about ‘Blindness’:

Songs about Sight & Seeing:


There are things you can’t reach. But
You can reach out to them, and all day long.
The wind, the bird flying away. The idea of god.
And it can keep you busy as anything else, and happier.
I look; morning to night I am never done with looking.
Looking I mean not just standing around, but standing around
As though with your arms open.
― Mary Oliver


I said: What about my eyes?
God said: Keep them on the road.
I said: What about my passion?
God said: Keep it burning.
I said: What about my heart?
God said: Tell me what you hold inside it?
I said: Pain and sorrow?
He said: Stay with it.
The wound is the place where the Light enters you.
attributed to Rumi


PRAYER by Richard Rohr
God of all Light and Truth, just make sure that I am not a blind man or woman.
Keep me humble and honest, and that will be more than enough work for you.


PRAYER by Nadia Bolz-Weber
God of desert prophets and unlikely messiahs, humble us.
Show us that there is more to see than what we look for.
More possibility. More love. More forgiveness …
Restore our sight so that we may see you in each other.


PRAYER by St Augustine
Late have I loved you, O beauty ever ancient, ever new.
Late have I loved you. You have called to me, and have called out,
and have shattered my deafness. You have blazed forth with light and
have put my blindness to flight! You have sent forth fragrance,
and I have drawn in my breath, and I pant after you.
I have tasted you, and I hunger and thirst after you.
You have touched me, and I have burned for your peace.


At the End of the Day: A Mirror of Questions — John O’Donohue
What dreams did I create last night?
Where did my eyes linger today?
Where was I blind?
Where was I hurt without anyone noticing?
What did I learn today?
What did I read?
What new thoughts visited me?
What differences did I notice in those closest to me?
Whom did I neglect?
Where did I neglect myself?
What did I begin today that might endure?
How were my conversations?
What did I do today for the poor and the excluded?
Did I remember the dead today?
When could I have exposed myself to the risk of something different?
Where did I allow myself to receive love?
With whom today did I feel most myself?
What reached me today? How did it imprint?
Who saw me today?
What visitations hd I from the past and from the future?
What did I avoid today?
From the evidence – why was I given this day?


On Seeing

Knowing it and seeing it are two different things. ― Suzanne Collins, Mockingjay

After all, the true seeing is within. ― George Eliot, Middlemarch

The eye through which I see God is the same eye through which God sees me; my eye and God’s eye are one eye, one seeing, one knowing, one love. ― Meister Eckhart, Sermons of Meister Eckhart

The only reason we don’t open our hearts and minds to other people is that they trigger confusion in us that we don’t feel brave enough or sane enough to deal with. To the degree that we look clearly and compassionately at ourselves, we feel confident and fearless about looking into someone else’s eyes. ― Pema Chodron

Rachel Carson said most of us go through life “unseeing.” I do that some days … I think it’s easier to see when you’re a kid. We’re not in a hurry to get anywhere and we don’t have those long to-do lists you guys have. ― Jim Lynch, The Highest Tide

The Eternal looked upon me for a moment with His eye of power, and annihilated me in His being, and become manifest to me in His essence. I saw I existed through Him. — Rumi

What we do see depends mainly on what we look for. … In the same field the farmer will notice the crop, the geologists the fossils, botanists the flowers, artists the colouring, sportmen the cover for the game. Though we may all look at the same things, it does not all follow that we should see them. ― John Lubbock, The Beauties of Nature and the Wonders of the World We Live in


I look at the world
— Langston Hughes

I look at the world
From awakening eyes in a black face—
And this is what I see:
This fenced-off narrow space
Assigned to me.

I look then at the silly walls
Through dark eyes in a dark face—
And this is what I know:
That all these walls oppression builds
Will have to go!

I look at my own body
With eyes no longer blind—
And I see that my own hands can make
The world that’s in my mind.
Then let us hurry, comrades,
The road to find.


NOBEL SPEECH (excerpt)
by Toni Morrison
“Once upon a time there was an old woman. Blind but wise.” Or was it an old man? A guru, perhaps. Or a griot soothing restless children. I have heard this story, or one exactly like it, in the lore of several cultures. “Once upon a time there was an old woman. Blind. Wise.”
In the version I know the woman is the daughter of slaves, black, American, and lives alone in a small house outside of town. Her reputation for wisdom is without peer and without question. Among her people she is both the law and its transgression. The honor she is paid and the awe in which she is held reach beyond her neighborhood to places far away; to the city where the intelligence of rural prophets is the source of much amusement.
One day the woman is visited by some young people who seem to be bent on disproving her clairvoyance and showing her up for the fraud they believe she is. Their plan is simple: they enter her house and ask the one question the answer to which rides solely on her difference from them, a difference they regard as a profound disability: her blindness. They stand before her, and one of them says, “Old woman, I hold in my hand a bird. Tell me whether it is living or dead.”
She does not answer, and the question is repeated. “Is the bird I am holding living or dead?”
Still she doesn’t answer. She is blind and cannot see her visitors, let alone what is in their hands. She does not know their color, gender or homeland. She only knows their motive.
The old woman’s silence is so long, the young people have trouble holding their laughter.
Finally she speaks and her voice is soft but stern. “I don’t know”, she says. “I don’t know whether the bird you are holding is dead or alive, but what I do know is that it is in your hands. It is in your hands.”
Her answer can be taken to mean: if it is dead, you have either found it that way or you have killed it. If it is alive, you can still kill it. Whether it is to stay alive, it is your decision. Whatever the case, it is your responsibility.
For parading their power and her helplessness, the young visitors are reprimanded, told they are responsible not only for the act of mockery but also for the small bundle of life sacrificed to achieve its aims. The blind woman shifts attention away from assertions of power to the instrument through which that power is exercised…

On Blindness

Kindness is the language which the deaf can hear and the blind can see. — Mark Twain

Blind don’t mean you can’t, you know, listen. — Stevie Wonder

Hatred is blind, as well as love. — Oscar Wilde

You can become blind by seeing each day as a similar one. Each day is a different one, each day brings a miracle of its own. It’s just a matter of paying attention to this miracle. — Paulo Coelho

As a blind man has no idea of colors, so have we no idea of the manner by which the all-wise God perceives and understands all things. — Isaac Newton

What spirit is so empty and blind, that it cannot recognize the fact that the foot is more noble than the shoe, and skin more beautiful than the garment with which it is clothed? — Michelangelo

Each of you, as an individual, must pick your own goals. Listen to others, but do not become a blind follower. — Thurgood Marshall

Until justice is blind to color, until education is unaware of race, until opportunity is unconcerned with the color of men’s skins, emancipation will be a proclamation but not a fact. — Lyndon B. Johnson

The superpowers often behave like two heavily armed blind men feeling their way around a room, each believing himself in mortal peril from the other, whom he assumes to have perfect vision. —  Henry Kissinger

You’re not supposed to be so blind with patriotism that you can’t face reality. Wrong is wrong, no matter who says it. — Malcolm X

There is an orderliness in the universe, there is an unalterable law governing everything and every being that exists or lives. It is no blind law; for no blind law can govern the conduct of living beings. — Mahatma Gandhi


Sonnet 19: When I consider
how my light is spent
— John Milton
When I consider
how my light is spent,
Ere half my days,
in this dark world and wide,
And that one Talent
which is death to hide
Lodged with me useless,
though my Soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker,
and present
My true account,
lest he returning chide;
‘Doth God exact day-labour,
light denied?’
I fondly ask.
But patience, to prevent
That murmur, soon replies,
‘God doth not need
Either man’s work
or his own gifts;
who best
Bear his mild yoke,
they serve him best.
His state
Is Kingly.
Thousands at his bidding speed
And post o’er Land and
Ocean without rest:
They also serve who only
stand and wait.’


Doing as others told me,
I was Blind.
Coming when others called me,
I was Lost.
Then I left everyone,
myself as well.
Then I found Everyone,
Myself as well.
― Rumi

About Physiological Blindness: Commentary
According to a recent survey, most Americans fear blindness. In fact, they fear it more than losing their hearing, speech, a limb or their memory. Nearly 88 percent of people surveyed considered having 20/20 vision vital to good overall health, while 47 percent believed that losing their sight would have the gravest effect on their daily lives. Loss of independence and quality of life were the top concerns for respondents. — The Chicago LighthouseAs someone who has successfully adapted to vision loss, I know that there are excellent resources, services and adaptations out there that can make it easier to live life without sight. There’s no doubt that blindness can present challenges and inconveniences in our everyday lives, but thanks to the countless services and resources available in the United States, it is possible for people with vision loss – like me – to lead equally fulfilling lives. Most of the fears and misconceptions about blindness and visual impairments are surmountable, and we should all work to help people understand that losing one’s sight does not have to mean losing independence. — Sandy Murillo



Events at JCC and around Town: THURS, Feb 22 – SUN, Feb 25

THURS, Feb 22 – SUN, Feb 25
(School Vacation Week)

THURS, Feb 22

FRI, Feb 23

  • Community Event: ZUMBA with Dottie
    8:15am • Whitney Community Center, Jackson

    • $5/pp
  • FITNESS CLASS  with Laurie McAleer 
    9:30am • Jackson Community Church

    • Free to all participants.
    • Gentle, chair-based stretch and fitness for all levels of ability
  • Community Event: LINE DANCING with Dottie
    9:15ma • Whitney Cmmunity Center, Jackson

    • $5/pp
  • Community Resource: LIBRARIES
    2-5pm • Jackson Library (more info: https://jacksonlibrary.org/)
  • FRIDAY SLIDERS & GLIDERS
    1pm • Jackson XC Ski Touring Ctr

    • Meeting every Friday starting January 7  – March
    • *Be ready to go at 1pm, finishing up about 3pm. If you need to rent equipment it is available at an additional cost (click here for rates and options.) Bring water, trail snack, and appropriate attire.
  • C3: COCKTAILS & CHRISTIAN CONVERSATION (meet in-person @ 6pm for STATIONS of the STEEPLE)
    • We will meet at church for the 6pm pop-up art show in lieu of the zoom bible study
  • STATIONS of the STEEPLE: A Day in the Life of Jackson (popup art show – opening tonight with artist Brian Healy)
    6pm • JCC Sactuary

    • Architect Brian Healy offers introductory remarks about his contemporary series of paintings featuring the JCC steeple
    • Explore the paintings, ask questions, enjoy a conversation about art , creativity, and spirituality
    • Local artist and architect Brian Healy, FAIA, shares the inspiration for his series of contemporary oil paintings featuring the JCC steeple at different hours of the days and seasons of the year.
    • Following his introduction, guests are invited to explore the 10 small paintings and 6 larger paintings on display around the sanctuary. He will be available for questions and conversation.
    • The installation of paintings will remain available for viewing in the sanctuary of the church through the end of February. Free and open to the public.
    • The front doors into the church’s sanctuary are open 24/7.
  • Community Events: MUSIC AROUND TOWN
    • Ledge Brewing: Food for Bears • 6-8pm
    • Wildcat Tavern: Al Shafner• 7-9pm • $5 cover
    • Shannon Door: Marty Quirk • 6-9pm
    • Red Parka: The Big Picture • 8-11pm
    • Black Mountain: Chris Schalick • 3:30-5:30
    • Shovel handle Pub: Randy Messineo • 5:30-8:30pm
  • Community Event: FRIDAY NIGHT JAZZ: Tom Robinson with Brian Hathaway & Rick Erwin
    7pm • Majestic Cafe, Conway

    • Walk-ins are always welcome, but space is limited; reservations are available to guarantee your seat and to indicate a seating choice.
    • The Friday Night jazz series has a $10 per person cover charge.
    • Doors at 6 pm; music  at 7pm.
    • Come in early and grab a panini before the music starts

SAT,  Feb 24

  • Community Resource: LIBRARIES
  • Community Event: OPEN HOURS @ Jackson Historical Society
    1-3pm • Jackson Historical Society

    • Also open by appointment.
    • More info: https://www.jacksonhistory.org/
    • White Mountain Art Sale
      • The Jackson Historical Society is holding its 21st annual White Mountain Art Sale. There are currently over 50 items from private collectors, primarily 19thcentury paintings. To see the online catalog, go to https://www.jacksonhistory.org/catalog.html. Items are available to purchase as they arrive, so check the catalog frequently to see new additions.
      • The Society is open Saturdays and Sundays 1-3pm.  If you are interested in a painting, the Society can open by appointment. Contact info@jacksonhistory.org.
  • Community Event: POPUP ART SHOW by Jackson Art Gallery
    11am-8pm • Omni Mount Washington Resort in Bretton Woods, NH in the Presidential Ballroom.

    • Winter POP-UP Art Show & Sale at the Omni Mount Washington Resort in Bretton Woods, NH in the Presidential Ballroom.
    • The show will open on Saturday, Feb 24 from 11am-8pm with a “Meet the Artists” reception from 5-8pm. It will continue on Sunday, Feb 25 from 10am-4pm.
    • There will be fine art in oil, watercolor, acrylic, pastel and woodblock prints from both local and nationally recognized artists.
    • For more info visit our website at https://www.jacksonartnh.com/
  • Community Event: SNOW SHOE TOUR
    10am-11:30am  • Tin Mtn Nature Learning Center

    • Join Outreach Coordinator, Heather McKendry, for a slow-paced snowshoe tour that explores the Tin Mountain Conservation trails in Albany, NH. Outdoor highlights include animal tracks, sightings and a beaver pond, while inside the Nature Learning Center you will find animal mounts and a gem & mineral collection. Winter is the perfect season to see evidence of our year-round residents and enjoy our winter landscape. If you need snowshoes we have them in all sizes!
    • Non-member tour:  $15/pp or $25/household & snowshoe rentals $15pp
    • Members are Free and may borrow snowshoes to use on property, so consider becoming a member!
    • Click here to register or call 603-447-6991. Walk ins welcome.
  • Community Event: FAMILY FULL MOON EXPLORATION
    5:30-7pm • Tin Mountain Nature Learning Center

    • It’s an evening of family fun! Join the staff on an evening snowshoe ramble through the beautiful fields and forests of TMCC’s Albany campus. We will see whoooo is out and about under February’s full moon. Be sure to dress warm. Designed for families, snowshoe rentals are included in the cost for any who needs them as well as a warm beverage to end the evening.
    • Program fee: $15/ family for members; $25/family for non-members
    • This program is currently full. Please call 603-447-6991 to be put on the wait list.
  • XC SKIING:
  • DOWNHILL SKIING:
  • Community Resource: LIBRARIES
  • Community Events: MUSIC AROUND TOWN
    • Wildcat Tavern: Apres Ski w/Al Shafner • 3-56pm – $5 cover / Jeremy Dean • 7-9pm – $5 cover
    • Shannon Door: Apres Ski w/Marty Quirk 4-6pm / Scott Baer • 7pm
    • Red Parka: Carbon 14 • 8-11pm
    • Ledge Brewing: Jim McLaughlin Band • 6-9pm
    • Black Mountain: Steve H. Deviant Music • 3:30-5:30pm

SUN, Feb 25

  • INTERFAITH SERVICE
    8am • Old red library in Jackson / zoom

    • Join us for poetry, prayer, and conversation.
  • WORSHIP @ JCC
    10:30am   • Jackson Community Church & Zoom

    • Message by Rev Gail Doktor
    • Music by Sharon Novak
  • HOSPITALITY
    11:30am • JCC Parish Hall

    •  Hospitality after Church
  • XC SKIING:
  • DOWNHILL SKIING:
  • Community Event: POPUP ART SHOW by Jackson Art Gallery
    10am-4pm • Omni Mount Washington Resort in Bretton Woods, NH in the Presidential Ballroom.

    • Winter POP-UP Art Show & Sale at the Omni Mount Washington Resort in Bretton Woods, NH in the Presidential Ballroom.
    • The show will open on Saturday, Feb 24 from 11am-8pm with a “Meet the Artists” reception from 5-8pm. It will continue on Sunday, Feb 25 from 10am-4pm.
    • There will be fine art in oil, watercolor, acrylic, pastel and woodblock prints from both local and nationally recognized artists.
    • For more info visit our website at https://www.jacksonartnh.com/
  • Community Event: SNOWSHOE TOUR 
    1:30-3pm • Tin Mountain Conservation Center, Albany

    • Join Outreach Coordinator, Heather McKendry, for a slow-paced walk that explores the Tin Mountain Conservation trails in Albany, NH. Outdoor highlights include an 1800s quarry and beaver pond, while inside the Nature Learning Center you will find animal mounts and a gem & mineral collection. Winter is the perfect season to see animal tracks and evidence of our year-round residents. Variable trail conditions, so bring traction devices if you have them.
    • Once the snow flies, the walks will be snowshoe tours and members may borrow snowshoes from TMCC while non-members can rent snowshoes. We have all sizes!
    • Non-member tour:  $15/pp or $25/household & snowshoe rentals $15pp
    • Members are Free and may borrow snowshoes to use on property, so consider becoming a member!
    • Click here to register or call 603-447-6991. Walk ins welcome.
  • Community Event: OPEN HOURS @ Jackson Historical Society
    1-3pm • Jackson Historical Society (Also open by appointment.)

    • More info: https://www.jacksonhistory.org/
    • White Mountain Art Sale
      • The Jackson Historical Society is holding its 21st annual White Mountain Art Sale. There are currently over 50 items from private collectors, primarily 19thcentury paintings. To see the online catalog, go to https://www.jacksonhistory.org/catalog.html. Items are available to purchase as they arrive, so check the catalog frequently to see new additions.
      • The Society is open Saturdays and Sundays 1-3pm  If you are interested in a painting, the Society can open by appointment. Contact info@jacksonhistory.org
  • Community Event: MUSIC AROUND TOWN
    • Shannon Door: Scott Baer • 6-9pm
    • Black Mountain: Steve H. Deviant Music • 3:30-5:30pm
    • Red Parka: Blue Sunday with Ken Clark & Brave Souls • 5-8pm

Ash Wednesday reflection

If you have become ash,
Then wait, you become a rose again.
And do not remember how often you have become ash,
But how often you were reborn in ashes to a new rose.

~ Rumi

I can hear the sizzle of newborn stars, and know anything of meaning, of the fierce magic emerging here. I am witness to flexible eternity, the evolving past, and I know we will live forever, as dust or breath in the face of stars, in the shifting pattern of winds. — Joy Harjo

Will You Meet Us? — Jan Richardson
Will you meet us in the ashes,
will you meet us in the ache
and show your face within our sorrow
and offer us your word of grace:
That you are life within the dying,
that you abide within the dust,
that you are what survives the burning,
that you arise to make us new.
And in our aching, you are breathing;
and in our weeping, you are here
within the hands that bear your blessing,
enfolding us within your love.

SONGS about DUST & ASHES: 


Joel 2:12-13
Yet even now, says the Lord,  return to me with all your heart, with fasting, with weeping, and with mourning;  rend your hearts and not your clothing. Return to the Lord your God, for God is gracious and merciful, slow to anger, abounding in steadfast love…


Rend Your Heart
A Blessing for Ash Wednesday

—Jan Richardson

To receive this blessing, all you have to do
is let your heart break.
Let it crack open.
Let it fall apart / so that you can see
its secret chambers, the hidden spaces
where you have hesitated / to go.
Your entire life
is here, inscribed whole
upon your heart’s walls:
every path taken
or left behind,
every face you turned toward
or turned away,
every word spoken in love
or in rage,
every line of your life
you would prefer to leave
in shadow,
every story that shimmers
with treasures known
and those you have yet
to find.
It could take you days
to wander these rooms.
Forty, at least.
And so let this be
a season for wandering,
for trusting the breaking,
for tracing the rupture
that will return you
to the One who waits,
who watches,
who works within
the rending
to make your heart
whole.

MARKED by ASHES (excerpt) —Walter Brueggeman  
Ruler of the Night, Guarantor of the day . . .
This day — a gift from you.
This day — like none other you have ever given,
or we have ever received.
This Wednesday dazzles us
with gift and newness and possibility.
This Wednesday burdens us
with the tasks of the day,
for we are already halfway home
halfway back to committees and memos,
halfway back to calls and appointments,
halfway on to next Sunday,
halfway back, half frazzled, half expectant,
half turned toward you, half rather not.
This Wednesday is a long way from Ash Wednesday,
but all our Wednesdays are marked by ashes —
we begin this day with that taste of ash in our mouth:
of failed hope and broken promises,
of forgotten children and frightened women,
we ourselves are ashes to ashes,
dust to dust; we can taste our mortality
as we roll the ash around on our tongues.
We are able to ponder our ashness with some confidence,
only because our every Wednesday of ashes anticipates
your Easter victory over that dry, flaky taste of death.
On this Wednesday, we submit our ashen way to you —
you Easter parade of newness.
Before the sun sets, take our Wednesday and Easter us,
Easter us to joy and energy and courage and freedom;
Easter us that we may be fearless for your truth.
Come here and Easter our Wednesday
with mercy and justice and peace and generosity.
We pray as we wait for the
Risen One who comes soon.

PRAYER — Mary Oliver

May I never not be frisky,
May I never not be risque.

May my ashes, when you have them, friend,
and give them to the ocean,

leap in the froth of the waves,
still loving movement,

still ready, beyond all else,
to dance for the world.

MEDITATIONS on MUD & SOIL
― Thích Nhất Hạnh

It is possible of course to get stuck in the “mud” of life. It’s easy enough to notice mud all over you at times. The hardest thing to practice is not allowing yourself to be overwhelmed by despair. When you’re overwhelmed by despair, all you can see is suffering everywhere you look. You feel as if the worst thing is happening to you. But we must remember that suffering is a kind of mud that we need in order to generate joy and happiness. Without suffering, there’s no happiness. So we shouldn’t discriminate against the mud. We have to learn how to embrace and cradle our own suffering and the suffering of the world, with a lot of tenderness.

— and —

The soil of our mind contains many seeds, positive and negative. We are the gardeners who identify, water, and cultivate the best seeds.

Living Psalm 51—Ash Wednesday
Confession for Creation Justice
Written by Maren Tirabassi

To any leader. A Psalm of David, when he took what he wanted, uncaring of the death and damage it caused, which was great.

Have mercy on us, O God,with the love that shaped all creation,
for we confess that we have been the ones
who blotted out —
made endangered and extinct —
creatures of air and land
by destroying their habitats.

If there is any clean water left, wash us,
but only after the creatures
of the oceans and lakes and rivers
return and are healed.

For we know our transgression —
we have torn off the tops of mountains
and our sin has fracked deep
into the very fissures of the earth.

Against you, melting your glaciers, we sin,
and we have done what is evil,
so that wildfires rage across
Australia, California,
and the Amazon rainforest
and the fox and koala and ocelot
judge us by their death.

Indeed, we are guilty against the newly born
who will be eleven years-old,
when our greed changes their earth
beyond hope of repair.

You desire truth,
but we clutch lies about the climate.
Help us repent so we can hear wisdom,
and make us wise enough to repent.

Let us not be clean,
but dirty in a community garden,
and wet with sweat
because we have walked and biked,
taken buses instead of cars,
cleaned ourselves with quick showers.

Let us taste the joy of locavores,
celebrate grizzly, wolf, gray whale,
sea lion, panda,
who have come back to thriving.

Most of all — let our hearts be stirred
not by what makes us wealthy in money
but what makes us wealthy in future.

Create in us a pure heart, O God,
and renew in us
the Spirit that hovers over your creation.

Then we will let our children teach us,
honor sacred lands of indigenous peoples,
open our lips for national parks
and our mouths for wildlife refuges.

Deliver us from being destroyers, O God,
and give us tongues that call for change.

For you have no delight
when we pile abundance on abundance.
The gift that pleases you
is one pollinator saved —
butterfly and bee, O God, is our acceptable prayer.

Ash Wednesday Provocation (day 1 of Lent)

Word for DAY 1 (Ash Wednesday) of Lent: WASTED AWAY.

This phrase comes from Psalm 32: 1-5, from the Narrative Lectionary associated with the first day of Lent. Throughout Lent, we will post words from each week’s scripture and music videos that address the themes raised by those phrases (lifted from the context of the Biblical passage).

Below we share two videos that connect to the idea of WASTED AWAY. They both struggle with the value of human life, and measure it differently.

The words and images in this first country music video by military veteran Graham Trude are especially heavy and could be triggering, as they grapple with suicidality, so please **proceed with caution**. The lyrics and images also convey the truth of deep trauma and pain, and are searingly honest.

How would you respond to hearing someone in such pain?

Here is a second music video also called Wasted Away, featuring the work of rap artist Tinn Mann.

ASH WEDNESDAY: Ashes to Go in Jackson & Glen (Wed, Feb 14)

Come by for Ashes to Go:

  • 8am – J-Town Deli
  • 10:30am • Jackson Community Church
  • 12:30pm • McSheffreys North / Glen Ledge Deli
  • 2:30pm • • Jackson Community Church

Receive ashes and a blessing for the beginning of your spiritual journey through Lent.

Those who want a full worship service are invited to Nativity Lutheran Church for a community service marking the start of the season.

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