Meditations on gratitude.

So while I think of it,
let me paint a thank-you on my palm
for this God, this laughter of the morning,
lest it go unspoken.
— Anne Sexton. excerpt from Welcome Morning

SONGS about THANKS:

PRAYER of THANKSGIVING— Howard Thurman
Today, I make my Sacrament of Thanksgiving.
I begin with the simple things of my days:
Fresh air to breathe,
Cool water to drink,
The taste of food,
The protection of houses and clothes,
The comforts of home.
For all these I make an act of Thanksgiving this day!
I bring to mind all the warmth of humankind that I have known:
My mother’s arms,
The strength of my father
The playmates of my childhood,
The wonderful stories brought to me from the lives
Of many who talked of days gone by when fairies
And giants and all kinds of magic held sway;
The tears I have shed, the tears I have seen;
The excitement of laughter and the twinkle in the
Eye with its reminder that life is good.
For all these I make an act of Thanksgiving this day!
I finger one by one the messages of hope that awaited me at the crossroads:
The smile of approval from those who held in their hands the reins of my security;
The tightening of the grip in a simple handshake when I
Feared the step before me in darkness;
The whisper in my heart when the temptation was fiercest
And the claims of appetite were not to be denied;
The crucial word said, the simple sentence from an open
Page when my decision hung in the balance.
For all these I make an act of Thanksgiving this day!
I pass before me the main springs of my heritage:
The fruits of labors of countless generations who lived before me,
Without whom my own life would have no meaning;
The seers who saw visions and dreamed dreams;
The prophets who sensed a truth greater than the mind could grasp
And whose words would only find fulfillment
In the years which they would never see;
The workers whose sweat has watered the trees,
The leaves of which are for the healing of the nations;
The pilgrims who set their sails for lands beyond all horizons,
Whose courage made paths into new worlds and far off places;
The saviors whose blood was shed with a recklessness that only a dream
Could inspire and God could command.
For all this I make an act of Thanksgiving this day!
I linger over the meaning of my own life and the commitment
To which I give the loyalty of my heart and mind:
The little purposes in which I have shared my loves,
My desires, my gifts;
The restlessness which bottoms all I do with its stark insistence
That I have never done my best, I have never dared
To reach for the highest;
The big hope that never quite deserts me, that I and my kind
Will study war no more, that love and tenderness and all the
inner graces of Almighty affection will cover the life of the
children of God as the waters cover the sea.
All these and more than mind can think and heart can feel,
I make as my sacrament of Thanksgiving to Thee,
[O God] in humbleness of mind and simplicity of heart.

FEASTING John O’Donohue

As we begin this meal with grace,
Let us become aware of the memory
Carried inside the food before us:

The quiver of the seed
Awakening in the earth,

Unfolding in a trust of roots
And slender stems of growth,

On its voyage toward harvest,
The kiss of rain and surge of sun;

The innocence of animal soul
That never spoke a word,

Nourished by the earth
To become today our food;

The work of all the strangers
Whose hands prepared it,

The privilege of wealth and health
That enables us to feast and celebrate.

Savoring the Small Stuff: Ordinary Gratitude as Spiritual Practice  (excerpt from full article— Carl Gregg

… ways that we can be more intentional about noticing and responding to the parts of our lives for which we are most (and least) grateful.

I. Noticing

… What do you tend to notice in your daily life? And why? … we could notice at any given time — different sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touches, or emotions — but our personalities shape what stands out to us and what fades into the background … you can amplify the power of this practice — and keep yourself accountable to regularly noticing what you are grateful for — by making a commitment to share your daily gratitude (or gratitudes) with someone else, whether it is a child, a partner, or a friend.

II. The Awareness Examen

… one of the most consistently helpful ways … is a practice called the Awareness Examen … It helps you weigh the value of various aspects of your life. The examen was first detailed by Ignatius of Loyola, the 16th century founder of the Jesuits … shorter and more accessible book by Dennis, Sheila and Matthew Linn called Sleeping with Bread: Holding What Gives You Life. In short, the examen encourages you to respond to two questions at the end of each day either around the dinner table with your family or silently before you go to sleep: … you can ask “What am I most grateful for today?” and “What am I least grateful for today?” Over time, to add nuance, you can ask variations on your consolations such as, “Where did I feel most connected, most alive, most energized, or most loved?” Correspondingly, you can ask “Where did I feel most isolated, most enervated, or most taken for granted?”

… And as you notice patterns of what consistently makes you feel connected, alive, energized, and loved, the invitation is to find ways to cultivate more of that person, place, or activity in your life. … As you notice patterns of what consistently makes you feel isolated, enervated, or taken for granted, an invitation is to consider if you should find ways to have less of that person, place, or activity in your life.

III. The Spiritual Practice of Savoring

This practice of noticing and choosing what is life-affirming over what is life-negating can seem particularly simple or obvious: structure your life to do more frequently those things that bring you consolation and do less frequently those things that bring you desolation … gently think back through my day, and name those things I’m grateful for. It’s honestly a great way to fall asleep: savoringthose things you are most grateful for. … Of course, all this talk about gratitude and savoring is easier said than done. Cultivating ordinary gratitude, noticing our consolations and desolations, and savoring them are all practices that happen over time. As with practicing the piano, practicing basketball, or practicing yoga, method and frequency matter … “Practices doesn’t necessarily make perfect, but it does make permanent.” … Practice makes permanent by ingraining habits that are difficult to break.

Application

For now, with the potential stress and joy of Thanksgiving still a few days away, I invite you to spend a short time practicing the art of savoring. Ask yourself, “What am I grateful for?” Then, pause in the silence, and listen. Allow yourself to be potentially surprised about what emerges for you as a source of gratitude. As you do so, remember the guidance from Buddha’s Brain: “Make [your consolation] last by staying with it for 5, 10, even 20 seconds [or longer].” Savor this source of gratitude with your whole self. “Focus on your emotions and body sensations…. Let the experience fill your body and be as intense as possible.”

·      What are you grateful for in your life?

·      What do you need to savor?

GRATITUDE— Edgar Albert Guest

Be grateful for the kindly friends that walk along your way,
Be grateful for the skies of blue that smile from day to day,
Be grateful for the health you own, the work you find to do,
For round about you there are men less fortunate than you.

Be grateful for the growing trees, the roses soon to bloom,
The tenderness of kindly hearts that shared your days of gloom,
Be grateful for the morning dew, the grass beneath your feet,
The soft caresses of your babes and all their laughter sweet.

Acquire the grateful habit, learn to see how blessed you are,
How much there is to gladden life, how little life to mar!
And what if rain shall fall to-day and you with grief are sad,
Be grateful that you can recall the joys that you have had.

I Am Thankful For — Nancy J Carmody

I am thankful for

… the mess to clean up after a party
because it means I have been surrounded
by friends.

​… the taxes that I pay
because it means that I’m employed.

… the clothes that fit a little too snug
because it means I have enough to eat.

​… .my shadow who watches me work
because it means I am out in the sunshine.

​… .the spot I find at the far end of the parking lot because it means I am
capable of walking.

​… all the complaining I hear about our Government because it means we have freedom of speech.

​… that lady behind me in church who sings offkey
​because it means that I can hear.

​… .lawn that needs mowing, windows
that need cleaning, and gutters that need fixing because it means I have a home.

… my huge heating bill
because it means that I am warm.

​… weariness and aching muscles
at the end of the day because it means
that I have been productive.

… the alarm that goes off in the early morning hours because it means
that I am alive.

REMEMBERING or BEING ALONE on HOLIDAYS: Different Viewpoints

PIE with SPIRITS Mary Wellemeyer

This is the very pumpkin pie my grandmother made—almost.
She was a modern woman
who knew how to follow recipes.
Receipts, she called them,
because they had been received.
She had a rule
for pie crust that was constant
until, from time to time, it changed.
I have that rule, in turn,
and it has moved on,
just a bit, from where she left it.
This is my special shared moment
with her, departed a quarter century.
As I work, I am all ages of myself,
and the thought of my tall son
comes to join us,
though he hardly knew her.
He makes pies with wild abandon,
sculpting them from material and artistry.
He has received pie somehow
at the level of soul.
The three of us make pie together,
preheating the oven,
cutting butter into flour,
adding water,
flouring a board,
rolling the crust.
To honor her, I follow the recipe.
To honor him, I change just one thing.
To honor myself, I take my time and smile.

ALONE on THANKSGIVING — Jaucelyn Montgomery I am thankful for the time alone
Glad everyone is going home
Now I can sit and be really lazy
No one to drive me absolutely crazy
Eat pizza and drink some beer
Sit around in my lowest gear
Watch football on T.V.
Light a fire and put on a favorite CD
Dance and sing to my heart’s content
This time alone will be well spent
So if you get the chance to skip Thanksgiving,
Make it fun don’t have misgivings
THE DAY AFTER — Virginia Miranda

Keeping up our tradition
Work my bones for the occasion
No one to appreciate my special feast
The dinner table was empty
No one to sit
No one to thank God for blessings
No one to carry the sense of appreciation
Where did the tradition go?
Did it go with my mother’s Alzheimers disease?
Did it go to the vanity world of nonchalant?
The day after
Just another day or survival
Just another day for a cup of coffee
Just another day to reflect on the chaos of the days before
Thanksgiving, just another day
Thank you God for letting me cope
Just another day

ALONE on THANKSGIVING — Katherine Bebbington
For the snow and bitter cold
For windows that rattle
And floorboards that creak
Ancient clocks that tick
Loudly in the silence
A cat curled against my side
A fire burning, candles lit
Lifting their smoke and fragrance
To God like prayers.
I’m thankful for this moment
Alone and quiet, and that
Somehow there is beauty
Even in this loneliness.
The courage to be brave;
For this I am thankful.

AWARENESS of INDIGENOUS PEOPLES
on Thanksgiving Holiday

Welcome to Indian Country— Rena Priest

Where is Indian Country?
It’s everywhere we stand.
It’s anywhere we dance.
It’s where the earth loves
the feel of our feet.

Welcome to Indian Country.

What does that mean?
It means this is where
we lift our voice in song
and make a joyful drumbeat
so our hearts can sing along.

Welcome to Indian Country.

This beloved country here,
where we honor our ancestors
by growing stronger every year,
by making laughter the answer
that wipes away our tears.

Welcome to Indian Country.

What does the future hold?
In uncertain times like these
we reach for words like hope
and things we can be sure of—
sunrises, beauty, and love.

Welcome to Indian Country.

It’s everywhere we dance and
where the feast is truly grand.

Welcome to Indian Country.
Now give us back our land!

The Thanksgivings

— Harriet Maxwell Converse

We who are here present thank the Great Spirit that we are here to praise Him.
We thank Him that He has created men and women, and ordered that these beings shall always be living to multiply the earth.
We thank Him for making the earth and giving these beings its products to live on.
We thank Him for the water that comes out of the earth and runs for our lands.
We thank Him for all the animals on the earth.
We thank Him for certain timbers that grow and have fluids coming from them for us all.
We thank Him for the branches of the trees that grow shadows for our shelter.
We thank Him for the beings that come from the west, the thunder and lightning that water the earth.
We thank Him for the light which we call our oldest brother, the sun that works for our good.
We thank Him for all the fruits that grow on the trees and vines.
We thank Him for his goodness in making the forests, and thank all its trees.
We thank Him for the darkness that gives us rest, and for the kind Being of the darkness that gives us light, the moon.
We thank Him for the bright spots in the skies that give us signs, the stars.
We give Him thanks for our supporters, who had charge of our harvests.
We give thanks that the voice of the Great Spirit can still be heard through the words of Ga-ne-o-di-o.
We thank the Great Spirit that we have the privilege of this pleasant occasion.
We give thanks for the persons who can sing the Great Spirit’s music, and hope they will be privileged to continue in his faith.
We thank the Great Spirit for all the persons who perform the ceremonies on this occasion.

The Delight Song of Tsoai-talee

—N. Scott Momaday

I am a feather on the bright sky
I am the blue horse that runs in the plain
I am the fish that rolls, shining, in the water
I am the shadow that follows a child
I am the evening light, the lustre of meadows
I am an eagle playing with the wind
I am a cluster of bright beads
I am the farthest star
I am the cold of dawn
I am the roaring of the rain
I am the glitter on the crust of the snow
I am the long track of the moon in a lake
I am a flame of four colors
I am a deer standing away in the dusk
I am a field of sumac and the pomme blanche
I am an angle of geese in the winter sky
I am the hunger of a young wolf
I am the whole dream of these things
You see, I am alive, I am alive
I stand in good relation to the earth
I stand in good relation to the gods
I stand in good relation to all that is beautiful
I stand in good relation to the daughter of Tsen-tainte
You see, I am alive, I am alive

Reflections on feeding the hungry: including our spiritual, emotional and psychological needs and desires

If it is bread that you seek, you will have bread.  If it is the soul you seek, you will find the soul. If you understand this secret, you know you are that which you seek. ― Rumi 

Love doesn’t just sit there, like a stone; it has to be made, like bread, remade all the time, made new. — Ursula Le Guin

water water water wind water … across the land shape of a torn heart … inside the divine spiral there is a voice, inside the voice there is light …  — Juan Felipe Herrera

Songs about Food, Fishing & Hunger:

From Blossoms
By Li-Young Lee
From blossoms comes this brown paper bag of peaches we bought from the boy at the bend in the road where we turned toward    signs painted Peaches.   From laden boughs, from hands, from sweet fellowship in the bins, comes nectar at the roadside, succulent peaches we devour, dusty skin and all, comes the familiar dust of summer, dust we eat.   O, to take what we love inside, to carry within us an orchard, to eat not only the skin, but the shade, not only the sugar, but the days, to hold the fruit in our hands, adore it, then bite into    the round jubilance of peach.   There are days we live as if death were nowhere in the background; from joy to joy to joy, from wing to wing, from blossom to blossom to impossible blossom, to sweet impossible blossom.

MEDITATIONS on BREAD

We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. — Viktor E. Frankl

The piece of bread is an ambassador of the cosmos offering nourishment and support. — Thich Nhat Hahn

Bread for myself is a material question. Bread for my neighbor is a spiritual one. — Nikolai Berdyaev

Men can starve from a lack of self-realization as much as they can from a lack of bread. — Richard Wright

 In the Lord’s Prayer, the first petition is for daily bread. No one can worship God or love his neighbor on an empty stomach. — Woodrow Wilson

There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread. — Mahatma Gandhi

Let there be work, bread, water and salt for all. — Nelson Mandela

There is a communion of more than our bodies when bread is broken and wine drunk. — M. F. K. Fisher

Sense the blessings of the earth in the perfect arc of a ripe tangerine, the taste of warm, fresh bread, the circling flight of birds, the lavender color of the sky shining in a late afternoon rain puddle, the million times we pass other beings in our cars and shops and out among the trees without crashing, conflict, or harm. — Jack Kornfield
 

It is not accidental that all phenomena of human life are dominated by the search for daily bread – the oldest link connecting all living things, man included, with the surrounding nature. — Ivan Pavlov

We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread. — Viktor E. Frankl

We light the oven so that everyone may bake bread in it … If I survive, I will spend my whole life at the oven door seeing that no one is denied bread and, so as to give a lesson of charity, especially those who did not bring flour.  — Jose Marti

Truth is, I think, if God just gave us our daily bread, many of us would be angry. ‘That’s all you’re going to give me? You’re just going to give me enough to sustain me for today? What about tomorrow or next year or 10, 20, 30 years from now? I want to know that I’m set up.’ And yet Jesus says just pray for your daily provisions. — Francis Chan

You can’t just leave out one part; the bread won’t rise if the yeast isn’t there.  — Holly Near

I like reality. It tastes like bread. — Jean Anouilh

To each other, we were as normal and nice as the smell of bread. We were just a family. — John Irving

We believe that salvation is to be found in wholesome work in a beloved land. Work will provide our people with the bread of tomorrow, and moreover, with the honor of the tomorrow, the freedom of the tomorrow.  — Theodor Herzl

Music I heard with you was more than music, and bread I broke with you was more than bread. — Conrad Aiken

For one country is different from another; its earth is different, as are its stones, wines, bread, meat, and everything that grows and thrives in a specific region.  — Paracelsus

When you fight to give your family bread, that’s not passion anymore: that’s conviction. — Yoel Romero

When we cast our bread upon the waters we can presume that someone downstream whose face we will never know will benefit from our action, as we who are downstream from another will profit from the grantor’s gift. — Maya Angelou 

Bread for myself is a material question. Bread for my neighbor is a spiritual one. – Nikoli Berdyaev

When the children of Israel were suffering from hunger and thirst, Moses prayed to God and God answered his prayers with food from heaven. The Qur’an says: “And We caused the clouds to comfort you with their shade, and sent down unto you manna and quails. [saying,]’Partake of the good things which We have provided for you as sustenance’” (2:57). — Muhammad Shafiq
 

WATER MEDITATIONS
 
Nothing is softer or more flexible than water, yet nothing can resist it. — Lao Tzu
 
For true love is inexhaustible; the more you give, the more you have. And if you go to draw at the true fountainhead, the more water you draw, the more abundant is its flow. — Antoine de Saint-Exupery
 
All water has a perfect memory and is forever trying to get back to where it was. — Toni Morrison

The miracle is not to walk on water. The miracle is to walk on the green earth, dwelling deeply in the present moment and feeling truly alive. — Thich Nhat Hahn

When you do things  from your soul,  you feel a river  moving in you, a joy. — Rumi
 
Thousands have lived without love, not one without water. — W. H. Auden

In a state of grace, the soul is like a well of limpid water, from which flow only streams of clearest crystal. Its works are pleasing both to God and man, rising from the River of Life, beside which it is rooted like a tree. — Saint Teresa of Avila
 
The atmosphere, the earth, the water and the water cycle – those things are good gifts. The ecosystems, the ecosphere, those are good gifts. We have to regard them as gifts because we couldn’t make them. We have to regard them as good gifts because we couldn’t live without them. — Wendell Berry
 
I have dreamed in my life, dreams that have stayed with me ever after, and changed my ideas; they have gone through and through me, like wine through water, and altered the color of my mind. — Emily Bronte
 
Being on a boat that’s moving through the water, it’s so clear. Everything falls into place in terms of what’s important and what’s not. — James Taylor

I think love is the greatest force in the universe. It’s shapeless like water. It only takes the shape of things it becomes. — Guillermo del Toro
 
Water does not resist. Water flows. When you plunge your hand into it, all you feel is a caress. Water is not a solid wall, it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it. Water is patient. Dripping water wears away a stone. Remember that, my child. Remember you are half water. If you can’t go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does. ― Margaret Atwood
 
In one drop of water are found all the secrets of all the oceans; in one aspect of You are found all the aspects of existence. ― Kahlil Gibran
 
The ocean was the best place, of course … It was a feeling of freedom like no other, and yet a feeling of communion with all the other places and creatures the water touched. ― Ann Brashares
 
Have you also learned that secret from the river; that there is no such thing as time?” That the river is everywhere at the same time, at the source and at the mouth, at the waterfall, at the ferry, at the current, in the ocean and in the mountains, everywhere and that the present only exists for it, not the shadow of the past nor the shadow of the future. ― Hermann Hesse, Siddhartha
 
No water, no life. No blue, no green. — Sylvia Earle

The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears or the sea. — Isak Dinesen
 
If there is magic on this planet, it is contained in water. — Loren Eiseley
 
Rivers, ponds, lakes and streams – they all have different names, but they all contain water. Just as religions do – they all contain truths. — Muhammad Ali
 
Saving our planet, lifting people out of poverty, advancing economic growth… these are one and the same fight. We must connect the dots between climate change, water scarcity, energy shortages, global health, food security and women’s empowerment. Solutions to one problem must be solutions for all. — Ban Ki-moon

Water is the driving force of all nature. — Leonardo da Vinci

New Years 2021: Poetry and song for the coming year.

Music:

A New Year’s Poem — Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892)

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky,
The flying cloud, the frosty light;
The year is dying in the night;
Ring out, wild bells, and let him die.

Ring out the old, ring in the new,
Ring, happy bells, across the snow;
The year is going, let him go;
Ring out the false, ring in the true.

Ring out the grief that saps the mind,
For those that here we see no more;
Ring out the feud of rich and poor,
Ring in redress to all mankind.

Ring out a slowly dying cause,
And ancient forms of party strife;
Ring in the nobler modes of life,
With sweeter manners, purer laws.

Ring out the want, the care, the sin,
The faithless coldness of the times;
Ring out, ring out my mournful rimes
But ring the fuller minstrel in.

Ring out false pride in place and blood,
The civic slander and the spite;
Ring in the love of truth and right,
Ring in the common love of good.

Ring out old shapes of foul disease;
Ring out the narrowing lust of gold;
Ring out the thousand wars of old,
Ring in the thousand years of peace.

Ring in the valiant man and free,
The larger heart, the kindlier hand;
Ring out the darkness of the land,
Ring in the Christ that is to be.

THE YEAR AS A HOUSE
A Blessing Jan Richardson

Think of the year
as a house:
door flung wide
in welcome,
threshold swept
and waiting,
a graced spaciousness
opening and offering itself
to you.

Let it be blessed
in every room.
Let it be hallowed
in every corner.
Let every nook
be a refuge
and every object
set to holy use.

Let it be here
that safety will rest.
Let it be here
that health will make its home.
Let it be here
that peace will show its face.
Let it be here
that love will find its way.

Here
let the weary come
let the aching come
let the lost come
let the sorrowing come.

Here
let them find their rest
and let them find their soothing
and let them find their place
and let them find their delight.

And may it be
in this house of a year
that the seasons will spin in beauty,
and may it be
in these turning days
that time will spiral with joy.
And may it be
that its rooms will fill
with ordinary grace
and light spill from every window
to welcome the stranger home.

—  Jan Richardson  ©

Beannacht (New Year blessing) – John O’Donohue

On the day when
The weight deadens
On your shoulders
And you stumble,
May the clay dance
To balance you.

And when your eyes
Freeze behind
The grey window
And the ghost of loss
Gets in to you,
May a flock of colours,
Indigo, red, green,
And azure blue,
Come to awaken in you
A meadow of delight.

When the canvas frays
In the currach of thought
And a stain of ocean
Blackens beneath you,
May there come across the waters
A path of yellow moonlight
To bring you safely home.

May the nourishment of the earth be yours,
May the clarity of light be yours,
May the fluency of the ocean be yours,
May the protection of the ancestors be yours.

And so may a slow
Wind work these words
Of love around you,
An invisible cloak
To mind your life.

THIS WEEK with JCC and Around Town: May 13-17

WED, May 13 

  • WALK a MILE
    Any time of the day • Walk indoors or outdoors. Share your images with us on facebookWalk a mile together (but apart). 
  • SCHOOL SPIRIT WEDNESDAY – 
    Sports Day
    All day: Wear your favorite sports team gear!
  • BREAKFAST with REV GAIL (zoom link: 179085789)
    8am • Zoom link: 179085789. (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
    Call to talk & gather. Option: Call in via touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID: 170985789 (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
  • Community Event: STORYTIME with Miss Meredith
    9am • Jackson Library Livestream
  • Community Event: STORY by Believe in Books
    9:30am • Believe in Books Livestream
  • Community Event: MT WASHINGTON OBSERVATORY’S VIRTUAL CLASSROOM (Facebook Live)
    11:15am • Mon, Tue, Fri @ Facebook Live
    Connect live to the highest peak in the Northeastern US, Mount Washington, New Hampshire, as Weather Observers and Education Specialists at the non-profit Mount Washington Observatory present a Facebook Live program called “Home of the World’s Worst Weather Live.”
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church

THURS, May 14

FRI, May 15

  • WALK a MILE
    Any time of the day • Walk indoors or outdoors. Share your images with us on facebookWalk a mile together (but apart). 
  • BREAKFAST with REV GAIL (zoom link: 179085789)
    8am • Zoom link: 179085789. (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
    Call to talk & gather. Option: Call in via touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID: 170985789 (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
  • Community Event: STORYTIME with Miss Meredith
    9am • Jackson Library
  • Community Event: STORY by Believe in Books
    9:30am • Believe in Books Livestream
  • Community Event: MT WASHINGTON OBSERVATORY’S VIRTUAL CLASSROOM (Facebook Live)
    11:15am • Mon, Tue, Fri @ Facebook Live
    Connect live to the highest peak in the Northeastern US, Mount Washington, New Hampshire, as Weather Observers and Education Specialists at the non-profit Mount Washington Observatory present a Facebook Live program called “Home of the World’s Worst Weather Live.”
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church
  • C3: COCKTAILS & CHRISTIAN CONVERSATIONS (zoom ID 179085789)
    5pm • Zoom link: 179085789. (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
    This week our hosts are Ginger & David Perkins. This week we discuss varied stories about the ‘commissioning’ of Jesus’ followers by comparing Matthew 28:16-20Mark 16: 14-18, and John 20: 20-23. Call to talk & gather. Option: Call in via touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID: 170985789 (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)

SAT, May 16

  • WALK a MILE
    Any time of the day • Walk indoors or outdoors. Share your images with us on facebookWalk a mile together (but apart). 
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church
  • Community Event: LIBRARY PICKUP HOURS
    2-6pm • Jackson Public Library
    Order one workday in advance. Please email with the title, author, and what formats you will accept (eBook, downloadable audio, Kindle, paperback or hardcover, anything else).

SUN, May 17

  • WALK a MILE
    Any time of the day • Walk indoors or outdoors. Share your images with us on facebookWalk a mile together (but apart). 
  • INTERFAITH GATHERING (zoom ID: 142985761)
    8am • (Zoom ID 142985761 (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
    Gather for poetry, conversation, readings & prayer. Bring your own caffeine. 🙂 Option: Call on touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID# 142985761 (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
  • CHOIR PRACTICE (zoom ID: 142985761)
    9:00am • Zoom ID 142985761 (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
    Warmups & choir practice with director Billy Carleton. Option: Call on touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID# 142985761 (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
  • VIRTUAL WORSHIP SERVICE (zoom ID: 142985761)
    10:30am • Zoom ID 142985761 (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
    Join us for worship, special music,  prayer, scripture, and reflection. Stay for virtual coffee hour. Service will also be live-streamed to website and Facebook (if technology supports this function on the day of event). Afterward, recordings of worship service will be posted to FacebookVimeo.com channel & Youtube.com channel. Option: Call on touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866, meeting ID# 142985761 (password required, email church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org)
  • VIRTUAL COFFEE HOUR
    Stay after worship and we will break into small groups for brief social opportunity. Same link as worship.
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church

Notes:

  • SUPPORT: Do you need support of any kind? We have volunteers ready to assist with errands and other projects (via library’s Jackson Bridge listserv), access to emergency supplies, and Rev Gail is available for emotional and spiritual companionship. Call Rev Gail directly at 978.273.0308 or email the church: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org
  • Jackson Public Library’s Guide to Online Services (activities, events, reading and information materials, etc)

THIS WEEK: June 3-9

MON, June 3

  • CLERGY PEER GROUP
    9-10:30am • Conference call
  • PEACE & EMPOWERMENT CAMP PLANNING SESSION
    1pm • JCC, second floor.
    Organizing content for Peace & Empowerment camp.
  • Community Event: MEET YOUR STATE LEGISLATORS
    7pm • North Conway Community Center
    Get to your know state legislators!

TUE, June 4

  • CLERGY LUNCH
    12:30pm • Center Conway, NH
    CLergy of the Eastern Slope meet for lunch and peer work. Rev Gail attends.
  • PASTORAL CARE VISIT
    Afternoon • Maine Med, Portland, ME

WED, June 5

  • PASTORAL CARE VISITS
    Locations in MA, ME & NH.

THURS, June 6

  • Community Event: WAY STATION LEADERSHIP TEAM
  • 8:30am • Way Station (Nativity Lutheran campus)
    Review of next steps prior to June opening.
  • BLISS YOGA with Anjali Rose
    9am • First Floor, Parish House / Jackson Community Church. Beginning stretch, flow and align yoga; safe for new practitioners. Weather dependent; if schools are delayed or closed, the class will be cancelled.
  • Community Event: STORY TIME for TODDLERS
    10am • Jackson Public Library
  • AA
    6:30pm • Second Floor, Church
  • Community Event: AFRO-SEMITIC MUSIC
    7-9pm • Barnstormers, 104 Main St., Tamworth
    The group explores both African, American, and Jewish liturgical and secular music interpreted in jazz. David Chevan leads this  ensemble, doing their residency in Tamworth, and they will culminate their experience with this performance. For more information, email Carly.
  • Community Event: M&D Playhouse’ THE SHADOW BOX
    7:30pm – Thursday – Saturday • M&D Playhouse
    More info and tickets.

FRI, June 7

  • PASTOR’S DROP-IN HOURS @ JTOWN
    8:30-10am • JTown Deli, Jackson
    Come by to visit with Rev Gail or text/call to make a separate date: 978.273.0308.
  • PASTOR’S OFFICE HOURS
    9:30-11am • Find Rev Gail @ Church.
    Come by to visit with Rev Gail or text/call to make a separate date: 978.273.0308.
  • TRILLIUM SUMMIT SETUP
    11:15am • Whitney Community Center
    Setup for June 8th’s trillium summit event. More info or to register for this program.
  • Community Event: FIRST FRIDAY DENMARK ARTS CENTER SONGWRITING CIRCLE
    Noon • Brown Church, Conway Village
    This is a Mountain Top Music program.
  • Community Event: M&D Playhouse’ THE SHADOW BOX
    7:30pm – Thursday – Saturday • M&D Playhouse
    More info and tickets.

SAT, June 8

  • **MEN’s BREAKFAST** (updated location: Wentworth Hotel)
    7:30-9am • Wentworth Hotel
    Friends and members of church gather for breakfast and conversation.
  • Community Event: TRILLIUM SUMMIT
    8:30am-12:30pm • Whitney Community Center
    Initiative  to enrich and empower the lives of girls and women in Mt Washington Valley. Keynote by Riley Parkhurst. Includes interactive games, crafts, discussions, presentations
    and demonstrations. Girls and women will explore their own strengths, learn new skills, become better communicators and learn how to form healthy relationships with others. More info or to register for this program.
  • UCC Event: HORTON CENTER OPEN HOUSE
    All Day • Horton Center, Pine Mountain
    11am worship @ Castle Rock followed by BBQ, tours & games! All day! All are welcome to our Open House! Please call or email to register. No charge.
  • Community Event: M&D Playhouse’ THE SHADOW BOX
    7:30pm – Thursday – Saturday • M&D Playhouse
    More info and tickets.

SUN, June 9

  • INTERFAITH GATHERING
    8am • Gazeboby Jackson Historical Society
  • WORSHIP – PENTECOST
    10:30am • Jackson Community Church
    * Organ/piano by Alan Labrie
    * Worship leadership & message by Rev Gail Doktor
    * Wear red!
  • Community Event: EARLY MUSIC & INSTRUMENTS with Ferré – Lang Trio
    4pm • Pvt Home, Jackson
    Featuring  Ferré-Lang Trio. Music for harpsichord, viola da gamba, violincello and contrabass. Directions emailed to reservation-holders prior to concert. ($35/person). More info.
  • Community Event: DA CAPO CONCERT
    4-5:30pm • Whitney Community Center. Directed by Mary Bastoni-Rebmann and John Waldie. Performing songs by Bob Seger, Van Morrison, Billie Holiday, Paul Williams and more! Suggested donation $10/pp.
  • Community Event: M&D Playhouse’ THE SHADOW BOX
    3:30pm – Sunday matinee • M&D Playhouse, North Conway
    More info and tickets.
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