9/11 Remembrance

Offered by one of our colleagues, local rabbi:

WAGE PEACE by Judyth Hill
Wage peace with your breath.
Breathe in firemen and rubble, breathe out whole buildings and flocks of red wing blackbirds.
Breathe in terrorists
and breathe out sleeping children and freshly mown fields.
Breathe in confusion and breathe out maple trees.
Breathe in the fallen and breathe out lifelong friendships intact.
Wage peace with your listening: hearing sirens, pray loud.
Remember your tools: flower seeds, clothes pins, clean rivers.
Make soup.
Play music; memorize the words for thank you in three languages.
Learn to knit, and make a hat.
Think of chaos as dancing raspberries,
imagine grief
as the out breath of beauty
or the gesture of fish.
Swim for the other side.
Wage peace.
Never has the world seemed so fresh and precious:
Have a cup of tea and rejoice.
Act as if armistice has already arrived.
Celebrate today.

 



Written by Portsmouth NH poet laureate Rev Maren Tirabassi in 2020:

PAUSE for September 11 by Rev Maren Tirabassi

Pause for September 11.
Don’t say — remember.

Some of our remembers
are complicated
by what was happening to us
and some of us do not remember
because we are too young.

Pause for September 11.
Don’t say – pray.

Some of us want to pray
about the fires ravaging the west,
the terrible losses
of the coronavirus pandemic,
and some want to assign God
a personal agenda
of the first two amendments,
immigration, or masks.

Pause for September 11.
Don’t say – be a patriot.

That has too many meanings,
mostly full of
this-is-the-right-way
and the rest of you are wrong
and can also be confused
with a football team, TV show,
or surface-to-air missile.

Just pause for September 11.
In 2001 particular people died.
People who helped continue to die.
People died in acts
of response or retaliation.
People who live still grieve.
People who live
try to make the world better
because of that day.

Pause.

PRAYER for 9/11 by Rev Gail Doktor (reprised)

Holy Love is bigger than our languages and names for Godself. And so, however we might address the Source of Holy Love, on a day that touches many faith tradittions, let us turn our hearts toward love.
         As an act of prayer, let us remember. And remembering, may we learn, that we might create a different future for generations yet to come.
         We are a nation comprised of many ages, colors, creeds, languages, faiths, ethnicities, and stories. Our forefathers and foremothers, whether they already lived here, arrived here by choice, or came without volition, have contributed to creating a land that— at its best—seeks to broaden the experience of freedom and access to justice for all of its people. Over the centuries this nation, which is upheld by people like you and me, and people different from you and me, has grown to be stronger and striven to become ever-more inclusive. Our differences contribute to that resilience and strength.
         At its best, this dream of freedom that encompasses all people continues be the foundation of our ideals: we are— or may become — home and sanctuary for all kinds of people.Although we know, when we look honestly at our own history, that we must often engage in civil struggle to attain transformation,  we remain committed to doing so.
         Yes, we get it wrong sometimes. Then again, we keep trying, and often enough, we also get it right.
         Today we pause to remember: in Jackson, in the Mt Washington Valley, and around the nation. People held moments of silence. People walked with flags. People sang. People played bagpipes. People rang steeple bells. People rolled in fire trucks, police cruisers, and ambulances. People gathered. People remembered, and told the story again.
          This morning, just like more than two deades ago, we are a country in the midst of growth. We do not live in a state of finalized perfection, but a creative and imperfect, messy and mighty, living experiment in liberty. When we remain motivated by our nation’s ideals, we act not out of fear, but out of courage and compassion. We build toward a sustainable peace for our own times and generations yet to come.  
         Today, we remember the attacks that killed people from 93 nations: originally 2,753 people in New York; 184 people at the Pentagon; and 40 people on Flight 93. Thousands more were injured, either immediately or in the aftermath of rescue, recovery and rebuilding. Others died or were incapacitated due to complications from living and serving around those sites. Wars have been waged, and peace-building attempted, in response to the events of 9/11: thousands more lives are included in that ongoing legacy, too.
         Yes, terrorism was aimed at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. For a period of time, the land, water and skies in and around Manhattan, New York, western Pennsylvania, and in Arlington County, Virginia became sites of trauma, loss. Also sites of heroism. Now they are places of remembrance and learning.
         Today we acknowledge the victims: brothers and sisters from 93 nations, not just ours. People of every imaginable faith. People who spoke different tongues. People of every hue, who created a rainbow of humanity. People who woke up, traveled into the city, and started their days, to live common lives.
         These people, largely, were not warriors, but civilians. And in the every-day-ness of their living and doing, they told stories much like ours. They had families. Partners. Children. Siblings. Friends. Communities that expected them home again.
          They had dreams. They played. They worked. They prayed. Most of them did not expect or ask to bear names that have become synonymous with a nation’s story about itself.
         Among them, the city’s first responders—who have become symbolic of our nation’s first responders —served at great risk, and on that day, ran toward danger rather than away from it.
          All of them, men, women, children, both civilians and those who served a specific call, carried names that have indeed, and unexpectedly, have become a different kind of prayer.
         Brothers and sisters, let us lift up today, not the message that those who sought to force change through violence would have us learn. May we resist acting out of fear. Those who instigated violence believed that they could clip the wings of our imaginations, and topple our beliefs out of the sky.
         Instead, let us remember, and honor, the lives of common people whose lives have taken on an uncommon meaning, May we remember, and doing so, reclaim, rebuild and re-imagine, here in our own local community and across our country and around the world, a bigger vision that embraces peace. One that still has feet, but also wings.
         May we struggle together to achieve our shared ideals. May we seek to do the next right thing, motivated by compassion and courage. May we continue to expand, within our own borders, the great promise of freedom so that it is accessible to all of our nation’s children, through a civil process that—at its best—gives birth to justice, cultivates peace, and recognizes the dignity and value of every human soul.
         Peace. May this be the lesson we choose to learn, in remembrance of those events, in recognition of those lives forever lost or changed. Peace — sustainable and healthy and equitable and accessible in its abundance for all people. May we remember the names and stories of our brothers and sisters, those who died and those were carry the trauma and hurt in their changed lives. May we add our own stories to theirs, as we are called to engage in the great civil work of peace that is the legacy of this day.
         Peace is not the dream of one nation, but necessarily, it is the prayer of all peoples in all nations all over the world. Shalom. Salaam. Peace.
         Amen
   
To learn more, visit the 9/11 memorial site: https://www.911memorial.org/20th-anniversary

JOHN PEPPER Celebration of Life

Jackson Community Church: Saturday, Dec. 4 • 11am 


Video link for those unable to attend the service: https://youtu.be/q6l-mR8K7ZY

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For attendance at the Celebration of Life service: MASKING is required.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in John’s name to the Friends of the Jackson Public Library, P.O. Box 276, Jackson, NH, 03846, http://Jacksonlibrary.orgJOHN PEPPER: After a long and active life, John Pepper aged 96 died at home in Jackson NH on November 10, 2021 surrounded by family. John is survived by his wife of 54 years, Alice Pepper and his daughter Sarah Isberg and husband Roger, and son Brian Pendleton and wife Darchelle Worley. He also leaves six grandchildren, Rowan, Bridget, Kirsten and Silas Gill and David and Daniel Pendleton, and a nephew, Rob Pepper and niece, Randy Pepper. He was predeceased in 2017 by his son, Eric Pendleton.
John was born May 8, 1925 in Newton MA to Benjamin Ward Pepper and Esther Harrod Pepper. After public schools in Newton, MA, he attended Phillips Exeter Academy where he acquired a love of learning and debate and developed friendships which would last throughout his lifetime. John was an active alumnus of PEA until his passing. He was a competitive swimmer at Exeter and later in college. He graduated in 1943 at the height of World War II, then joined the US Navy and received a Bachelor of Arts in Naval Science at Tufts University before deploying to Guam to guard supplies (including “acres and acres of beer”) for the invasion of Japan. After the Navy he earned a second degree at Tufts, then following in his father's footsteps began a career in the insurance industry. He worked briefly in New York City before returning to work in Boston, where he shared an apartment on Beacon Street with a group of friends. He bought a home in Marblehead MA in 1955 where he lived for the next three decades.
In 1967 John married Alice Pendleton, whom he met while skiing at Wildcat Mountain, and acquired a family which included Alice's three pre-teenage children, Brian, Sarah and Eric, and one large Collie named Ninette. John advanced through the ranks in the insurance industry, becoming chief operating officer of the Boston office of Frank B Hall, Inc until he retired in 1984.

After retirement John and Alice moved to Alice's family home in Jackson NH, though he and Alice continued to travel to Boston once a month to attend concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, nurturing their shared love of classical music for more than 50 years. They maintained a busy schedule of skiing in the winter, sailing in the summer, gardening and community involvement. They were active members of the White Mountain Milers and the New England Ski Museum, where John was a director for many years. They competed on the Sise Cup masters ski racing circuit every winter.

John and Alice also enjoyed traveling to Europe for hiking, bicycling, and visiting gardens. John was known for his dedication to outdoor physical activity and his devotion to the people with whom he shared his passions.

He made lifelong friends at virtually every stage of his life, greeting them whether on the slopes of Wildcat or the coast of Maine with his trademark yodel "Hupdiddlyodeeyo-teeyodelliyodeliyo”. John was an early and beloved member of the White Mountain Ski Runners a.k.a. the "White Mules" ski club, and with them organized the first charter ski flight to Europe in 1954.

He instilled and encouraged a love for hiking and skiing in his children and grandchildren, together with Alice leading them up the summits of the New Hampshire 4000-footers and down the trails of Wildcat Mountain during their formative years. Recognizing a good deal when he saw one, John bought a lifetime pass to Wildcat when he was in his 30’s and skied on it for 50 years, completing approximately 12,000 top to bottom runs on the mountain during that time.
John was a member of the Eastern Yacht Club since 1957, and for several decades spent weeks every summer sailing down the coast of Maine on the "Keewaydin" with Alice, joined by friends, or children and grandchildren on occasion, visiting islands and gardens, swimming every morning rain or shine and buying dinner from passing lobster boats whenever possible. Inspired to take up running by a family friend, John ran three marathons and five half- marathons in his 50s and 60s then switched to bicycling for another 25 years. When he could no longer cycle he switched to walking and became a familiar sight to residents of the Black Mountain triangle and the Carter Notch Road.

Pragmatic that way, John was willing to exchange one activity for another as he grew older, taking up each one with his characteristic energy and enthusiasm. His favorite way to spend a winters day in his 80’s was to ski 8 nonstop runs at Wildcat, followed by an hour of cross-country skiing in Jackson, and then swimming laps in an outdoor heated pool at Attitash. He and Alice became avid golfers and continued to play into their 90’s. John was always liberal with his time and energy, supporting Alice in her various pursuits and faithfully nurturing children and grandchildren as they moved into adulthood. He was a caring, generous and wise head of his family for more than half a century and we will never forget him.

For attendance at the Celebration of Life service: MASKING is required.
In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in John’s name to the Friends of the Jackson Public Library, P.O. Box 276, Jackson, NH, 03846, http://Jacksonlibrary.org

JOHN PEPPER: After a long and active life, John Pepper aged 96 died at home in Jackson NH on November 10, 2021 surrounded by family. John is survived by his wife of 54 years, Alice Pepper and his daughter Sarah Isberg and husband Roger, and son Brian Pendleton and wife Darchelle Worley. He also leaves six grandchildren, Rowan, Bridget, Kirsten and Silas Gill and David and Daniel Pendleton, and a nephew, Rob Pepper and niece, Randy Pepper. He was predeceased in 2017 by his son, Eric Pendleton.

John was born May 8, 1925 in Newton MA to Benjamin Ward Pepper and Esther Harrod Pepper. After public schools in Newton, MA, he attended Phillips Exeter Academy where he acquired a love of learning and debate and developed friendships which would last throughout his lifetime. John was an active alumnus of PEA until his passing. He was a competitive swimmer at Exeter and later in college. He graduated in 1943 at the height of World War II, then joined the US Navy and received a Bachelor of Arts in Naval Science at Tufts University before deploying to Guam to guard supplies (including “acres and acres of beer”) for the invasion of Japan. After the Navy he earned a second degree at Tufts, then following in his father's footsteps began a career in the insurance industry. He worked briefly in New York City before returning to work in Boston, where he shared an apartment on Beacon Street with a group of friends. He bought a home in Marblehead MA in 1955 where he lived for the next three decades.

In 1967 John married Alice Pendleton, whom he met while skiing at Wildcat Mountain, and acquired a family which included Alice's three pre-teenage children, Brian, Sarah and Eric, and one large Collie named Ninette. John advanced through the ranks in the insurance industry, becoming chief operating officer of the Boston office of Frank B Hall, Inc until he retired in 1984.

After retirement John and Alice moved to Alice's family home in Jackson NH, though he and Alice continued to travel to Boston once a month to attend concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, nurturing their shared love of classical music for more than 50 years. They maintained a busy schedule of skiing in the winter, sailing in the summer, gardening and community involvement. They were active members of the White Mountain Milers and the New England Ski Museum, where John was a director for many years. They competed on the Sise Cup masters ski racing circuit every winter.

John and Alice also enjoyed traveling to Europe for hiking, bicycling, and visiting gardens. John was known for his dedication to outdoor physical activity and his devotion to the people with whom he shared his passions.

He made lifelong friends at virtually every stage of his life, greeting them whether on the slopes of Wildcat or the coast of Maine with his trademark yodel "Hupdiddlyodeeyo-teeyodelliyodeliyo”. John was an early and beloved member of the White Mountain Ski Runners a.k.a. the "White Mules" ski club, and with them organized the first charter ski flight to Europe in 1954.

He instilled and encouraged a love for hiking and skiing in his children and grandchildren, together with Alice leading them up the summits of the New Hampshire 4000-footers and down the trails of Wildcat Mountain during their formative years. Recognizing a good deal when he saw one, John bought a lifetime pass to Wildcat when he was in his 30’s and skied on it for 50 years, completing approximately 12,000 top to bottom runs on the mountain during that time.

John was a member of the Eastern Yacht Club since 1957, and for several decades spent weeks every summer sailing down the coast of Maine on the "Keewaydin" with Alice, joined by friends, or children and grandchildren on occasion, visiting islands and gardens, swimming every morning rain or shine and buying dinner from passing lobster boats whenever possible. Inspired to take up running by a family friend, John ran three marathons and five half- marathons in his 50s and 60s then switched to bicycling for another 25 years. When he could no longer cycle he switched to walking and became a familiar sight to residents of the Black Mountain triangle and the Carter Notch Road.

Pragmatic that way, John was willing to exchange one activity for another as he grew older, taking up each one with his characteristic energy and enthusiasm. His favorite way to spend a winters day in his 80’s was to ski 8 nonstop runs at Wildcat, followed by an hour of cross-country skiing in Jackson, and then swimming laps in an outdoor heated pool at Attitash. He and Alice became avid golfers and continued to play into their 90’s. John was always liberal with his time and energy, supporting Alice in her various pursuits and faithfully nurturing children and grandchildren as they moved into adulthood. He was a caring, generous and wise head of his family for more than half a century and we will never forget him.

Farewell to Judy Fuller

With permission from the Fuller family, we pass along this brief alert: Judy Fuller of Glen, NH, a longtime Jackson and Bartlett neighbor, dedicated members of our faith community, and a thoughtful, kind and active presence in our village for many years, died over the winter holidays, after recently relocating to Pennsylvania. She was living there with her immediate family and was surrounded by love and support. Her friends here in Mt Washington Valley express their sense of sorrow and loss, and have already begun to share treasured stories about deep and meaningful friendships with Judy and her family.

Notably, friends and neighbors Christmas caroled at Judy’s Glen, NH home just prior to her move in early December. We are glad she knew she was a significant part of our community.

We will share additional information, such as a full biography, suggestions for memorial gifts and plans for a service of remembrance as the family makes those decisions. Meanwhile, her daughter Terri says, “Thank you for your … kind words. … We have talked about a service in the [summer] time frame.“

Judy Fuller is survived by her daughter Terri and partner Kathy, her son Scott and wife Ursula, and grandchildren Calvin and Nico. Judy was preceded in death by her husband of 57 years, Carl Fuller.

CELEBRATING the LIFE of MARY HOWE

Here is the biography shared by her family: Mary Francoise Paul Howe of Jackson, NH died suddenly on December 4, 2019 at a youthful 84 years old.
  Mary was born on September 5, 1935 in Philadelphia, PA. Her parents had immigrated to the US from Normandy, France the year before her birth. During WWII they moved to Montreal, Canada. When Mary was a teenager the family moved to Denver, CO. She attended Kent Denver Country Day School for Girls, where she was a member of International Relations Club with her friend and classmate, former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. After graduating, she attended Pembroke College in Providence, RI.    In her 20s, Mary was living in Cambridge, MA and joined friends on trips to Overlook, the Howe family summer home, in Jackson, NH, where she met John Howe. They discovered a shared passion for fly-fishing, went out fly-fishing together, and fell in love.    They married in Ann Arbor, MI in 1961. In marrying John, Mary gained two stepsons, Andrew and Nathaniel. Daughter Catherine (Cuppy) was born the following September. They moved to Fairbanks, AK, where John worked on early weather satellite research. Mary took classes at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, including silver working. In 1965, they moved to Annapolis, MD, where daughter Lucy was born. Next they moved to Acton, MA where John worked for GE on early nuclear submarine development. In 1969 John and Mary decided to return to Jackson and live year-round at Overlook, while John worked as an engineer at the Mount Washington Observatory until his retirement.    Mary began raising sheep, chickens, pigs and other animals and had expansive and chaotic vegetable gardens. She encouraged her daughters to participate in all of these endeavors. Cuppy and Lucy also remember many messy finger painting projects on the kitchen floor in their underpants. The family frequently hiked in the Presidential Range and sailed off the coast of Maine. Mary loved to travel and was lucky enough to have friends and family who were willing to take care of her daughters while she went off on adventures.    Once her daughters left home, Mary got involved in local politics. She was on the school board and the conservation board. She was part of a local bird watching group. John retired in 1988 and they bought and refurbished Vixen,an old wooden sailboat. They lived aboard for several years, sailing between Maine and the Bahamas, their grand adventure. It was at this time Mary began painting.    In recent years, Mary was active in the Jackson arts community and her painting career flourished. She was an early supporter of the Tin Mountain Conservation Center and an avid birder. She was also a member of a French Club and the Jackson Community Church and its poetry group. Her most recent passion was learning to play classical guitar.    Aside from her husband, John, she leaves behind her sister Annick Paul Lopez, daughters, Catherine (Cuppy) and her husband, Dick Gordon, of Wellesley, MA; and Lucy and her husband, Reese Hersey, of East Calais, VT; as well as her stepsons, Andrew Howe and his wife, Gay, of Jackson, NH; and Nathaniel Howe and his wife, Pamela Hitchcock, of Belfast, ME. Additionally, she leaves her seven adored grandchildren, Whitney and Spencer Howe; Molly Howe and her husband, Jake Newton; John (Gus), Charlie, and Sam Gordon; and Ogden (Noggo) Hersey.    A service will be held at the Jackson Community Church Saturday, December 21 at 2:00. All are welcome. Donations can be made in her memory to Tin Mountain Conservation Center, Albany, NH at tinmountain.org

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