FAREWELL to BEULAH JODRIE

SERVICES:
11am • Private family gathering in sanctuary
Noon • Funeral Service in sanctuary

(Service open to family and church and community friends who knew Beulah.)
Early afternoon • Funeral service at JCC will be followed by private graveside service for family in Chocorua, NH.
BIOGRAPHY: The family shares this biography.

Beulah Viola Jodrie was born on March 21, 1921 in Alton Bay, New Hampshire, at the southern tip of Lake Winnipesaukee. Her mother was Irish catholic living in Boston when she first met Beulah’s father, who was a true Yankee woodsman. He was working as a chauffeur, and kept his long hair hidden under his cap. They fell in love and eloped.

Beulah was one of 9 children and was extremely close to her siblings and parents but in particular her father, who became a White Mountain guide. They had many adventures together probably the most important for Beulah were the hikes in the White Mountains. Other than her girls, she came to love the mountains more than anything else. She felt free in the hills and taught her girls to enjoy the outdoors and mountains too. She would hike whenever she could, even as she aged, never able to give up the quest of just “one more time.” She often hiked alone, with just water and a couple of oranges! She didn’t need anything else, except to move forward on the trail… to reach the summit; whether Mt. Chocorua or Mt Washington.

Beulah was a scholar, although, in her timidity would never admit it. She was an avid and voracious reader from very early on and never gave up her love for books. She excelled academically, never receiving a grade lower than an A; and was the Valedictorian of her high school class. From there she went on to the Conservatory of Music in Boston, studying the violin for two years. After realizing she didn’t care to be in the spotlight on stage she left the Conservatory and moved to be closer to her then love, Bob Jodrie, when she enrolled in a nursing school in Gardiner, Mass. Shortly thereafter, realizing she and Bob did not want to be separated she moved to Fitchburg to be closer to him. They married shortly thereafter and began their family. Daughters Sharon and Gretchen were born in Fitchburg. A short time thereafter they moved to RI where a new adventure started for Beulah. She had two more daughters, Jennifer and Melissa. At the age of 40 she decided she wanted to continue her education and enrolled at Barrington College where she received her BA in literature; then enrolled at Brown University where she received her Masters. After getting her Masters, Brown offered her a teaching position, teaching American Literature – her favorite authors were William Faulkner, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Walt Whitman and Henry David Thoreau. These writers touched her soul and she wanted to give their message to her students – which she did with the utmost sensitivity and earnestness. They adored her for that.

Beulah moved back home to Madison, New Hampshire after retiring to care for her husband, Bob, until his passing in 1998. She lived independently until 2017 when she moved to Merriman House for support. She will be deeply missed by her family and all who knew her.

Racial Justice Initiatives

EVENTS & DATES to NOTE

Sun, Sept 13 by zoom @ 7pm, Racial Justice Advocacy & Learning Group (first conversation):

Zoom link and password required. M onthly topical conversations.This group is also making decisions re priorities and ongoing advocacy in valley around businesses, sporting industry, education and other areas of interest.

5:30pm – Tue, Sept 15 or 9am – Fri, Sept 18: Traces of the Trade Film Screening & Discussion: 
Registration is required for this online event; admission is free. Content is appropriate for family viewing. Visit www.jacksonlibrary.org or www.jacksoncommunitychurch.org for registration and information about the event. Register for free via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/traces-of-the-trade-registration-120275524331. More info on the documentary is available via. www.tracesofthetrade.org.
Excerpt from press release: Jackson Public Library and Jackson Community Church co-sponsor the timely online screening of Traces of the Trade: A Story From The Deep North, followed by a discussion facilitated by co-hosts Dain Perry and his wife Constance Perry. Facilitator Dain Perry is one of nine cousins featured in this documentary that unearths a hidden legacy of slavery in America. Traces of the Trade: A Story From The Deep North, first shown at the Sundance Film Festival, follows the journey by filmmaker Katrina Browne  and nine of her cousins — including Dain Perry — into the dark past of the slave trade, which enriched their white New England family.  Allow three hours to watch the film and share in the conversation.

Oct 8, All Eyes Are Upon Us: Racial Struggles in the Northeast, from Jackie Robinson to Deval Patrick Film ScreeningLink for registration: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1gS5qkrVBhRodnk8ZiLSwE2b-VyG3bkjlw2hZ5_-8n-g/editMore info: Mt Washington Valley libraries (with thanks to Conway for initiating and coordinating it) will co-host a Zoom program on October 8th called All Eyes Are Upon Us: Racial Struggles in the Northeast, from Jackie Robinson to Deval Patrick

Seminars & Trainings (some are time sensitive so register immediately if interested)Crossroads Antiracism Training Sessions: https://www.tickettailor.com/events/crossroadsantiracismorganizingtrainingDeepening Connection and Understanding Across NH’s Urban/Rural Divide:
https://leadershipnh.org/news/14077

Reading & community book clubs:
Note: Church also has lending library out front by doors.
Sign books out as you wish.
Two local book clubs are reading books from recommended lists
One of them is: When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir by Patrisse Khan-Cullors, Asha Bandele
Library is developing a broad selection of children’s and adult reading options

Daily activities as mindfulness opportunities and/or prayer life — themes on ‘praying ceaselessly’ from 1 Thessalonians

Here are the two best prayers I know: ‘Help me, help me, help me’ and ‘Thank you, thank you, thank you.’ — Anne Lamott

Blessing of your work — John O’Donohue

May the light of your soul guide you.
May the light of your soul bless the work
You do with the secret love and warmth of your heart.
May you see in what you do the beauty of your own soul.
May the sacredness of your work bring healing, light and renewal to those
Who work with you and to those who see and receive your work.
May your work never weary you.
May it release within you wellsprings of refreshment, inspiration and excitement.
May you be present in what you do.
May you never become lost in the bland absences.
May the day never burden you.
May dawn find you awake and alert, approaching your new day with dreams,
Possibilities and promises.
May evening find you gracious and fulfilled.
May you go into the night blessed, sheltered and protected.
May your soul calm, console and renew you.


Questions to consider:

  • Do you have a spiritual practice of prayer or contemplation?
  • If not, what time of day might you regularly include such a practice? As you first wake up? Before you go to bed?
  • What if prayer could take place in the midst of daily activities such as washing dishes, traveling to school or work, walking outside, brushing your teeth, washing hands or something else simple?
  • How would you change the way you approach such a daily activity, to pay more attention, to be present and thoughtful about what you’re doing, and let it become a form of prayer, by being attentive and grateful to what happens?

Walking as Prayer

While it’s common knowledge that walking is good for physical health, many people may never have considered that walking is also good for their spiritual health. — Thomas Hawkins

Let every step you take upon the earth be as a prayer. — Black Elk

But where do we even start on the daily walk of restoration and awakening? We start where we are. — Anne Lamott

Many of us walk for the sole purpose of getting from one place to another. Now suppose we are walking to a sacred place. We would walk quietly and take each gentle step with reverence. I propose that we walk this way every time we walk on the earth. The earth is sacred and we touch her with each step. We should be very respectful, because we are walking on our mother. If we walk like that, then every step will be grounding, every step will be nourishing. — Thich Nhat Hanh

Prayer as Mindfulness, Consciousness and Seeking Union with Something More

Prayer is talking to something or anything with which we seek union, even if we are bitter or insane or broken… Prayer is taking a chance that against all odds and past history, we are loved and chosen, and do not have to get it together before we show up. The opposite may be true: We may not be able to get it together until after we show up in such miserable shape. — Anne Lamott

The Sufis tell a wonderful story about a seeker who one night hears a voice saying, “Who’s there?” and the Sufi seeker answers with great excitement, “It is I, it is I, Lord! I am right here!” And the voice disappears. Years later, the Sufi again hears the voice calling, “Who’s there?” The Sufi thinks, “Here’s that voice again!” and he gets very excited at yet another opportunity, and responds, “It is I, Lord, and I seek you with all my heart!” Once again, the voice disappears. Some years later he again hears the voice calling, “Who’s there?” This time, the Sufi replies, “Thou Lord, only Thou!” This story clearly describes the process of moving oneself into the mind, heart, and consciousness of God. It comes, yes, little by little, but it also comes instantaneously, once we move into what the ancient mystics call “prayer without words.” This prayer is the prayer of consciousness. This prayer is the very breath of life. Consciousness that the breath I breathe is the breath of God is the sum total of an attitude of prayer. — Joan Chittister

Breath as Prayer

The fourth element of our body is air. The best way to experience the air element is the practice of mindful breathing. “Breathing in, I know I am breathing in. Breathing out, I know I am breathing out.” After saying these sentences we can abbreviate them by saying “In” as we breathe in and “Out” as we breathe out. We don’t try to control our breathing. Whether our in-breath is long or short, deep or shallow, we just breathe naturally and shine the light of mindfulness on it. When we do this we notice that, in fact, our breathing does become slower and deeper naturally. “Breathing in, my in-breath has become deep. Breathing out, my out-breath has become slow.” Now we can practice, “Deep/slow.” We don’t have to make an extra effort. It just become deeper and slower by itself, and we recognize that. Later on, you will notice that you have become calmer and more at ease. “Breathing in, I feel calm. Breathing out I feel at ease. I am not struggling anymore. Calm/ease.” And then, “Breathing in, I smile. Breathing out, I release all my worries and anxieties. Smiles/release.’ We are able to smile to ourselves and release all our worries. There are more than three hundred muscles in our face, and when we know how to breathe in and smile, these muscles can relax. This is “mouth yoga.” We smile and are able to release all our feelings and emotions. The last practice is, “Breathing in, I dwell deeply in the present moment. Breathing out, I know this is a wonderful moment. Present moment/wonderful moment.” Nothing is more precious than being in the present moment fully alive and aware.

“In, out
Deep, slow
Calm, ease
Smile, release”

Present moment, wonderful moment.”If you use this poem during sitting or walking meditation, it can be very nourishing and helping. Practice each line for as long as you wish. — Thich Nhat Hanh

Walking as Prayer

While it’s common knowledge that walking is good for physical health, many people may never have considered that walking is also good for their spiritual health. — Thomas Hawkins

Let every step you take upon the earth be as a prayer. — Black Elk

But where do we even start on the daily walk of restoration and awakening? We start where we are. — Anne Lamott

Many of us walk for the sole purpose of getting from one place to another. Now suppose we are walking to a sacred place. We would walk quietly and take each gentle step with reverence. I propose that we walk this way every time we walk on the earth. The earth is sacred and we touch her with each step. We should be very respectful, because we are walking on our mother. If we walk like that, then every step will be grounding, every step will be nourishing. — Thich Nhat Hanh

Prayer as Mindfulness, Consciousness and Seeking Union with Something More

Prayer is talking to something or anything with which we seek union, even if we are bitter or insane or broken… Prayer is taking a chance that against all odds and past history, we are loved and chosen, and do not have to get it together before we show up. The opposite may be true: We may not be able to get it together until after we show up in such miserable shape. — Anne Lamott

The Sufis tell a wonderful story about a seeker who one night hears a voice saying, “Who’s there?” and the Sufi seeker answers with great excitement, “It is I, it is I, Lord! I am right here!” And the voice disappears. Years later, the Sufi again hears the voice calling, “Who’s there?” The Sufi thinks, “Here’s that voice again!” and he gets very excited at yet another opportunity, and responds, “It is I, Lord, and I seek you with all my heart!” Once again, the voice disappears. Some years later he again hears the voice calling, “Who’s there?” This time, the Sufi replies, “Thou Lord, only Thou!” This story clearly describes the process of moving oneself into the mind, heart, and consciousness of God. It comes, yes, little by little, but it also comes instantaneously, once we move into what the ancient mystics call “prayer without words.” This prayer is the prayer of consciousness. This prayer is the very breath of life. Consciousness that the breath I breathe is the breath of God is the sum total of an attitude of prayer. — Joan ChittisterBreath as Prayer

The fourth element of our body is air. The best way to experience the air element is the practice of mindful breathing. “Breathing in, I know I am breathing in. Breathing out, I know I am breathing out.” After saying these sentences we can abbreviate them by saying “In” as we breathe in and “Out” as we breathe out. We don’t try to control our breathing. Whether our in-breath is long or short, deep or shallow, we just breathe naturally and shine the light of mindfulness on it. When we do this we notice that, in fact, our breathing does become slower and deeper naturally. “Breathing in, my in-breath has become deep. Breathing out, my out-breath has become slow.” Now we can practice, “Deep/slow.” We don’t have to make an extra effort. It just become deeper and slower by itself, and we recognize that. Later on, you will notice that you have become calmer and more at ease. “Breathing in, I feel calm. Breathing out I feel at ease. I am not struggling anymore. Calm/ease.” And then, “Breathing in, I smile. Breathing out, I release all my worries and anxieties. Smiles/release.’ We are able to smile to ourselves and release all our worries. There are more than three hundred muscles in our face, and when we know how to breathe in and smile, these muscles can relax. This is “mouth yoga.” We smile and are able to release all our feelings and emotions. The last practice is, “Breathing in, I dwell deeply in the present moment. Breathing out, I know this is a wonderful moment. Present moment/wonderful moment.” Nothing is more precious than being in the present moment fully alive and aware.“In, out
Deep, slow
Calm, ease
Smile, release
Present moment, wonderful moment.”If you use this poem during sitting or walking meditation, it can be very nourishing and helping. Practice each line for as long as you wish. — Thich Nhat Hanh

Learning more about 1 Thessalonians:

• Primer for how to read 1 Thessalonians: https://www.rightnowmedia.org/Training/Post/Preview/231121
• Overview of 1 Thessalonians by the Bible Project: https://youtu.be/No7Nq6IX23c

Daily prayer and mindfulness practices:
• How to establish a daily prayer practice:http://practicingfaith.com/how-to-establish-a-daily-prayer-practice/
• Daily meditations to support prayer as daily practice include:UCC’s Daily Devotional
Daily Meditation from Richard Rohr’s Center for Action and ContemplationHeartland Center for Spirituality’s Daily Devotional (home of Thomas Merton)
Mindfulness app from Thich Nhat Hanh’s Plum VIllageCultivating prayer as daily practice: https://undoubtedgrace.com/5-things-you-must-do-to-create-a-productive-prayer-routine/

Work & Daily Activity as Prayer

Somehow or another, we have to get beyond the notion that life is divided into moments of going to church, saying our prayers, living in God or living our lives.— Sr Joan Chittister

… God’s attention is indeed fixed on the little things. But this is not because God is a great cosmic cop, eager to catch us in minor transgressions, but simply because God loves us–loves us so much that we the divine presence is revealed even in the meaningless workings of daily life. It is in the ordinary, the here-and-now, that God asks us to recognize that the creation is indeed refreshed like dew-laden grass that is “renewed in the morning” or to put it in more personal and also theological terms, “our inner nature is being renewed everyday”. Seen in this light … involving God in the minuitae of daily life might be revisioned as the very love of God. ― Kathleen Norris


Sunday Prayers (excerpt) … So, for now I just ask that:

  • When I sing along in my kitchen to each song on Stevie Wonder’s Songs in The Key of Life Album, that it be counted as praise. (Happy 70thBirthday, SW!)
  • And that when I read the news and my heart tightens in my chest, may it be counted as a Kyrie. 
  • And that when my eyes brighten in a smile behind my mask as I thank the cashier may it be counted as passing the peace.
  • And that when I water my plants and wash my dishes and take a shower may it be counted as remembering my baptism.
  • And that when the tears come and my shoulders shake and my breathing falters, may it be counted as prayer.
  • And that when I stumble upon a Tabitha Brownvideo and hear her grace and love of you may it be counted as a hearing a homily.
  • And that as I sit at that table in my apartment, and eat one more homemade meal, slowly, joyfully, with nothing else demanding my time or attention, may it be counted as communion.Amen.
    — Nadia Bolz-Weber

It is impossible to see how good work might be accomplished by people who think that our life in this world either signifies nothing or has only a negative significance. If, on the other hand, we believe that we are living souls, God’s dust and God’s breath, acting our parts among other creatures all made of the same dust and breath as ourselves; and if we understand that we are free, within the obvious limits of moral human life, to do evil or good to ourselves and to the other creatures – then all our acts have a supreme significance. If it is true that we are living souls and morally free, then all of us are artists. All of us are makers, within mortal terms and limits, of our lives, of one another’s lives, of things we need and use… If we think of ourselves as living souls, immortal creatures, living in the midst of a Creation that is mostly mysterious, and if we see that everything we make or do cannot help but have an everlasting significance for ourselves, for others, and for the world, then we see why some religious teachers have understood work as a form of prayer… Work connects us both to Creation and to eternity. ― Wendell Berry

… researchers found that people who washed dishes mindfully—participants focused on smelling the soap, feeling the water temperature and touching the dishes—increased their feelings of inspiration by 25 percent and lowered their nervousness levels by 27 percent. “It appears that an everyday activity approached with intentionality and awareness may enhance the state of mindfulness,” the study authors conclude. —Shahrzad Warkentin

What is bread? Depends on whom you ask. A source of complex carbohydrates, says the nutritionist. Bread is seed and soil, sun and rain, sweat and toil, says the farmer. Bread is flour and water, yeast and salt, skill and fire, says the baker. Bread is the sweet memory of my grandmother’s kitchen, says the old man. Bread is expensive, says the worker. Bread is power, says the politician. Bread is reconciliation and community, says the priest. Bread is cheap, says the rich fool. Bread is God’s gift, say those who pray with Jesus. Give us each day our daily bread. Farmers prepare the field and sow the seed, take care of the plants and bring in the harvest. Millers grind the wheat, the rye, the barley, and sift them to make the finest flours. Bakers blend the ingredients and turn them into beautiful, fragrant loaves of bread. Truck drivers deliver the seed, the fertilizer, the crop, the flour, the bread. Workers stock the shelves at night at the store. And we see so little of it until we notice the cashier whose wrist hurts from pulling tons of groceries across the scanner, and finally the kid who asks, ‘Paper or plastic?’ and puts the loaf in our bag. Some people call this a supply chain, but to me it will always be the poetry of human labor and the grace of God. Bread is a communal product, and no bread is eaten alone. There really is no such thing as my bread, there is only our bread, and every loaf contains our whole life together. When we pray with Jesus, we pray for bread and our life together, we pray for the land and all who live on it, for justice and compassion, and for the love that breaks bread even with the enemy. — Thomas Kleinert

This Week at JCC and Around Town: TUE, Sept 8 – SUN, Sept 13

TUE, Sept 8

  • Community Event: VOTING: LOCAL POLLS OPEN & VOLUNTEERS WORKING at POLLS
    Check town websites for correct times for each location. Conway Sun printed incorrect hours for some places.
  • Community Event: SAU9 & JACKSON GRAMMAR SCHOOL
    First day of school for students
  • UCC Event: ANNUAL MEETING PLANNING & WORSHIP TEAMS
    10am-2pm • Zoom
    Rev Gail attends some sessions.
  • UCC Event: STAR ISLAND MORNING SERVICE
    9am • Zoom
    Led by Rev Mary Edes.
  • UCC Event: STAR ISLAND ONLINE AUCTION
    All Week • Link to auction: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1e79o4wGENQRVlCiQyb94F1da2wdbNPFLTXWSpgU2o_o/edit
    If you wish to bid online, you must email Cassidy Hooker to participate (unless you already received this email directly from her and are already in her contact database). This online auction supports Star Island. Please read the instructions on page 1.
  • CLERGY LUNCH
    12:30pm • Zoom
    Local clergy gathering for meal and discussion.
  • Community Event: LIBRARY PICKUP/PRINTING HOURS
    2-6pm • Jackson Public Library
    You can place a hold –
    • online via your Koha account using your 14 digit library card number
    • Contact by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org. or leave a voice message at 603-383-9731
    • We will send you an email as soon as your item/s are ready for pickup. If you need to make special arrangements, please let us know, we want to help.
    • Printing and scanning services are also available. Contact us for details.

WED, Sept 9

  • JCC & WALK to END ALZHEIMERS
    9:15am – Arrive at Whitaker Woods parking lot / 9:30am – Walk together
    Church & community-affiliated team walking under Eagle’s Rest team led by Jeanette Heidmann.All welcome to walk or to sponsor walkers to make a difference in the research to end Alzheimers. Link to join or sponsor a walking team! Link: https://act.alz.org/site/TR/Walk2020/ME-Maine?team_id=611420&pg=team&fr_id=13510
  • UCC Event: STAR ISLAND BINGO
    3pm – Deadline to email Cassidy Hooker to participate. / 5pm – Bingo Game begins
  • UCC Event: STAR ISLAND ONLINE AUCTION
    All Week • Link to auction (available by emailing Cassidy Hooker.)
    If you wish to bid online, you must email Cassidy Hooker to participate (unless you already received this email directly from her and are already in her contact database. This online auction supports Star Island. Please read the instructions on page 1.
  • Community Service: WAY STATION BOARD of DIRECTORS
    1:30pm • Zoom
    Board meeting to discuss policies and programs. JCC volunteers attend as officers of board.
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church

THURS, Sept 10

  • Community Event: YIN/RESTORATIVE YOGA with Anjali Rose
    8am • Zoom (Link provided once participants complete health waiver is sent to anjalirose15@gmail.com and registration/payment for class received.) See Anjali’s website for full list of classes offered and instructions to register. 
  • UCC Event: STAR ISLAND ONLINE AUCTION
    All Week • Link to auction (available by emailing Cassidy Hooker.)
    If you wish to bid online, you must email Cassidy Hooker to participate (unless you already received this email directly from her and are already in her contact database. This online auction supports Star Island. Please read the instructions on page 1.
  • UCC Event: STAR ISLAND SHARING SERVICE
    8pm • Zoom link to be provided. Please sign up by 5pm that day using this form (or email Cassidy Hooker to participate). Songs, poems, jokes, personal stories – we’d love to hear from you.
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church
  • Community Event: LIBRARY PICKUP/PRINTING HOURS
    2-6pm • Jackson Public Library
    You can place a hold –
    • online via your Koha account using your 14 digit library card number
    • Contact by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org. or leave a voice message at 603-383-9731
    • We will send you an email as soon as your item/s are ready for pickup. If you need to make special arrangements, please let us know, we want to help.
    • Printing and scanning services are also available. Contact us for details.
  • Community Service: WAY STATION SHIFT
    3pm • Curbside package preparation
    5pm • Shift at curbside with guests
  • Community Event: CRAFTUP (Jackson Library)
    4pm • Zoom: https://zoom.us/j/888091236 
    All crafts and all skill levels are welcome.
  • Community Event: DISCOVER your BLISS: Retreat with Anjali Rose
    4:30pm – Retreat Begins / Runs through Sat, Sept 12 @ 8pm Practice yoga, connect with others through outdoor activities, and enjoy local foods from favorite spots. Taking place partially in-person at outdoor locations throughout the Mount Washington Valley as well as partially virtual. This retreat will be limited to 10 people. You’ll be asked to bring a yoga mat, water bottle, towel, bug spray, sunscreen, comfortable shoes, extra layer, hand sanitizer, and a mask. Early bird pricing by September 4 ($229.00), otherwise registration is due by September 8 ($249.00). Price does not include extra fee for bike rental ($40.00) or sleeping accommodations (sleep at home or book local lodging). A detailed itinerary will be provided upon registration, but includes: 3 instructor-led outdoor yoga classes, 2 healthy breakfasts, snacks, 2 healthy lunches, healthy dinner, naturalist-led hike, all supplies for mandala rock art activity, and more! Registration is now open! Please complete this form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1kjk-FTykiOnHg4iEpHccYZiXSk5imxon8QFgr37UjGE/viewform?edit_requested=true

FRI, Sept 11

SAT, Sept 12

  • Community Event: OSSIPEE PINE BARRENS BIRD WALK (Tin Mountain program)
    8am • Ossipee Pine Barrens
    Registration required. Space is limited and reservations are required. Call 603-447-6991. Join lifelong birder Will Broussard to walk hrough this unique habitat on the lookout for southbound migrant warblers, flycatchers, and other songbirds. Tips for identification of fall-plumaged birds will be discussed. Plan accordingly for 2.5 hours spent outside on foot.
  • Community Event: DISCOVER your BLISS: Retreat with Anjali Rose
    Ends Sat, Sept 12 @ 8pm
    Spaces limited: fee required. Registration by Sept 8. Please complete this form: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1kjk-FTykiOnHg4iEpHccYZiXSk5imxon8QFgr37UjGE/viewform?edit_requested=true
  • Community Event: LIBRARY PICKUP HOURS
    10am-2pm • Jackson Public Library
    You can place a hold
    • online via your Koha account using your 14 digit library card number
    • Contact by email: staff@jacksonlibrary.org. or leave a voice message at 603-383-9731
    • We will send you an email as soon as your item/s are ready for pickup. If you need to make special arrangements, please let us know, we want to help.
    • Printing and scanning services are also available. Contact us for details.
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church
  • Community Event: COLD RIVER RADIO SHOW MINI-CONCERT – Micromassé
    Evening • Wildcat Inn & Tavern garden
    Dinner Reservations Required: Not included in ticket price – Call  603-383-4245 for dinner reservations at 4:30, 4:45 and 5pm. Show Tickets are $15 and DO NOT Include Dinner  Online ticket sales only: $15/pp.  TICKETS: https://aspectproductionsnewengland.com/tickets. Info about performer: www.micromasse.com

SUN, Sept 13

  • HISTORIC TRIANGLE SERVICE
    8am •  Historic Triangle Outdoor Site, Jackson, NH (corner of Wilson & Black Mountain Rds)
    Small group gathering outside at pavilion. Use social-distancing protocols: bring your own mask and chairs. Join us for worship and prayer.
  • IN-PERSON WORSHIP in SANCTUARY
    9:15am • Social-distancing & Masks REQUIRED
    We will use only designated open pews only (2 out of 3 pews are roped off). Families (and quaran-team groups who have already been in close proximity) may sit together. We will avoid passing of peace, handshaking, hugs, etc. We also ask that you use hand sanitizer as you enter and wear your own mask throughout service. Worship will be streamlined with scripture, prayer and live music by Alan Labrie (if he’s able to arrive while worship is in session): no congregational singing. When worship ends, participants are asked to leave the church with social distance between each group;  we will immediately be preparing for the next zoom-based 10:30am worship service. If you have any signs of illness such as fever, cough, congestion, stomach upset, you are courteously asked to remain home and take care of yourself.
  • VIRTUAL WORSHIP (Zoom link required).
    10:30am •  Zoom link & password required.
    Join us for worship, music, reflection, prayer, scripture. Stay for virtual coffee hour. Service will also be live-streamed to website and Facebook (if technology supports this function on the day of event). Afterward, recordings of worship service will be posted to FacebookVimeo.com channel & Youtube.com channel. Option: Call on touch-tone phone: 929.436.2866. (meeting ID and password required).
  • RING BELL
    Noon • Jackson Community Church
  • Community Event: DINNER & JAZZ CONCERT
    (Mountain Top Music Program)

    3:45pm • Wildcat Tavern
    The Bradley Jazz Collective performs outdoors in the Garden of the Wildcat Inn & Tavern, Jackson. $50/pp (reserve by table).
    Includes Al Hospers on bass, Jarrod Taylor on guitar, Craig Bryan, Jr on percussion and Mike Sakash on sax. Dinner is included with admission. A set menu will include vegetarian and gluten free options. Beverages are not included in the admission, but are available from a full bar. Seating is limited, and reservations must be made for a table of 4-6, 4, 2-3 or 1. When making a reservation, you will be asked to choose from a 3:45 or 4:15 dining time. 
    Link for tickets. Link: https://mountaintop.ludus.com/index.php?step=seats
  • RACIAL JUSTICE ACTION & LEARNING GROUP
    7pm • Zoom (link required: contact church via email for info: jcchurch@jacksoncommunitychurch.org) First in monthly series of conversations. RSVP to JCC if interested in participating.
     
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